The first overall pick is from Puerto Rico, but it’s not something Bud Selig should be crowing about

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The first overall pick in the draft was Carlos Correa, from Puerto Rico.  This made Bud Selig happy (scroll to second item):

Commissioner Bud Selig was thrilled to see Houston select 17-year-old shortstop Carlos Correa with the top pick in the draft. Correa played at the Puerto Rico Baseball Academy, and Major League Baseball is always looking to grow the game and foster talent outside the 50 states.

“Wonderful. It really is. It’s everything we’re trying to accomplish, in a lot of ways,” Selig said. “So I’m very pleased. Very pleased.”

There is lots of talk about how he’s the highest draft pick out of Puerto Rico ever, and how that’s such a great thing for the Puerto Rico Baseball Academy.  And it is. But it’s also misleading.

There has only been a draft for players from Puerto Rico since 1989. Before that players from Puerto Rico were free agents, just like international players.  Also before that there were many more players from Puerto Rico in affiliated baseball than there are now, with most experts saying that the institution of the draft drove many away from baseball due to the far worse economic rewards compared to life under free agency.

The Puerto Rico Baseball Academy, then, wasn’t something that elevated baseball on the island. It was something that, at best, is trying to make up for the destruction Major League Baseball wrought to amateur baseball there by imposing the draft in the first place.

That Correa is the number one pick is a good thing for him, for Puerto Rico and for baseball.  That it took 23 years to get a number one overall pick from the land that produced Roberto Clemente, Orlando Cepeda and Roberto Alomar is not something that Bud Selig should be particularly proud of “accomplishing,” however.

Clayton Kershaw struggles with control, walks six Marlins

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Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw entered Wednesday night’s start against the Marlins without having issued a walk in his previous three starts. In fact, his last walk came on April 3 when he issued a free pass to Paul Goldschmidt with the bases empty and two outs in the bottom of the first inning. All told, Kershaw was on a streak of 26 walk-less innings before he took the mound at home to take on the Marlins.

Kershaw started off Wednesday in character, striking out the side in the first inning. He issued a walk in a tough second inning, but escaped without allowing a run. Kershaw walked two more in the third and again danced out of danger. In the fourth, Kershaw walked Lewis Brinson to load the bases with no outs and — you guessed it — didn’t end up allowing a run. His errant control finally came back to bite him in the fifth when Kershaw issued back-to-back two-out walks, then served up a three-run home run to Miguel Rojas down the left field line. His night was done when he completed the inning. Five innings, three runs, five hits, six walks, seven strikeouts, 112 pitches.

The six walks Kershaw issued over five innings marked his first six-walk outing since April 7, 2010 when he issued six free passes to the Pirates in 4 2/3 innings. The only other time he walked as many was on August 3, 2009 against the Brewers in a four-plus inning outing. Kershaw hasn’t even walked five batters in an outing recently — the last time was September 23, 2012 against the Reds.