MLB draft picks 2-5: Mariners take catcher Mike Zunino

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No. 2 – Minnesota Twins – high school OF Byron Buxton

The Astros pulled off a surprise pick and left Mark Appel on the board, but the Twins stuck with the guy most expected them to take. Buxton, 18, is a pure center fielder with a big-time arm — he just had an 18-strikeout game as a pitcher — but he’s a raw hitter with a long swing that needs some shortening up. Again, there’s an awful lot of upside here, and his defense could make him a major leaguer even if he doesn’t hit as much as hoped. Still, he’s not going to move quickly.

No. 3 – Seattle Mariners – Florida catcher Mike Zunino

The Mariners obviously aren’t sold on Jesus Montero as a long-term catcher. Zunino has a very good glove and will definitely stay behind the plate. His bat probably won’t be good enough t make him a star, though he was the best power hitter on the top-ranked Gators this season, batting .318/.388/.667 with 18 homers in 231 at-bats. He could contribute as soon as 2014.

No. 4 – Baltimore Orioles – LSU RHP Kevin Gausman

The Orioles apparently thought Gausman, not Appel, was the top college pitcher on the board. They wanted someone who was going to be ready quickly, and Gausman doesn’t lack for polish. The 21-year-old was 11-1 with a 2.72 ERA and a 128/27 K/BB ratio in 115 2/3 innings for LSU this season. He probably won’t start games for the Orioles this season, but if the team remains in the race, he’d be an intriguing relief option down the stretch.

No. 5 – Kansas City Royals – San Francisco RHP Kyle Zimmer

The Royals also bypassed Appel. Zimmer has the better fastball, touching 97 mph at times, and with his plus curve, he probably possesses superior upside to the Stanford right-hander. How quickly he moves will depend on the progress he makes with his changeup. He’s definitely not as far along with his third pitch as either Appel or Gausman.

Pick 1: Astros select shortstop Carlos Correa                          .

Picks 6-10: Pirates halt Mark Appel’s free-fall                              .

Picks 11-15: A’s, Mets select high school shortstops                .

Picks 16-20: Nationals roll the dice on RHP Giolito                .

Picks 21-31: Blue Jays add potential 2012 callup Stroman

Jeff Wilpon reminds Mets fans that insuring David Wright “is not cheap”

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It’s can’t be easy being a Mets fan. Your team plays in the biggest city in America and should, theoretically, have big payrolls and always be in contention. They aren’t, however, partially because of horrendous luck and ill-timed injuries, partially because of poor baseball decisions and partially because the team’s ownership got taken down by a Ponzi scheme that, one would think anyway, sophisticated businessmen would recognize as a Ponzi scheme. We’ll leave that go, though.

What Mets fans are left with are (a) occasional windows of contention, such as we saw in 2014-16; (b) times of frustrating austerity on the part of ownership when, one would hope anyway, some money would be spent; (c) an inordinate focus on tabloidy and scandalous nonsense which just always seems to surround the club; and (c) a lot of disappointment.

You can file this latest bit under any of or many of the above categories, but it is uniquely Mets.

Team president Jeff Wilpon spoke to the press this afternoon about team payroll. In talking about payroll, David Wright‘s salary was included despite the fact that he may never play again and despite the fact that insurance is picking up most of the tab. Wilpon’s comment:

I’m guessing every team has a line item, someplace, about the costs of insurance. They’re businesses after all, and all businesses have to deal with that. They do not talk about it as a barrier to spending more money on players to the press, however, as they likely know that fans want to be told a story of hope and baseball-driven decisions heading into a new season and do not want to hear about all of the reasons the club will not spend any money despite sitting in a huge market.

This doesn’t change a thing about what the Mets were going to do or not do, but it does have the added bonus of making Mets fans roll their eyes and ask themselves what they did to deserve these owners. And that, more than almost anything, is the essence of Mets fandom these days.