Astros select shortstop Carlos Correa first overall

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The Astros shocked everyone Monday night, selecting Puerto Rican shortstop Carlos Correa with the first overall pick in the MLB draft.

It was widely anticipated that the Astros would take Stanford right-hander Mark Appel, who certainly could have made an impact much sooner than the 17-year-old Correa. The Astros went with potential, though. Correa’s stock has climbed of late, and it didn’t sound as though he’d make it out of the top five.

Correa is already 6-foot-4 and offers excellent power potential for a middle infield. The question is whether he’ll be able to stay at shortstop as he continues to fill out. Scouts believe he’s a legitimate shortstop as is, but if he puts on 20 pounds over the next few years and loses a step, he might have to move to third base.

Given that the Astros are hardly one pitcher away from contention, it made sense for them to swing for the fences here. Correa is likely at least four years away from contributing, but scouts are largely in agreement that he has one of the two or three greatest upsides in the draft.

(We’ll be recapping the rest of the first round as the picks come in. Check back for links here or head over to the HBT mainpage for updates.)

Picks 2-5: Twins take Buxton, Mariners select Zunino               .

Picks 6-10: Pirates halt Mark Appel’s free-fall                              .

Picks 11-15: A’s, Mets select high school shortstops                .

Picks 16-20: Nationals roll the dice on RHP Giolito                .

Picks 21-31: Blue Jays add potential 2012 callup Stroman

Yankees to hire Josh Bard as their new bench coach

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Aaron Boone has no experience as a coach or a manager at any level. As such, some have speculated that he’d hire a more seasoned hand as his bench coach as he begins his first season as Yankees manager. Someone like, say, Eric Wedge, who was a candidate for the job Boone got and who once managed Boone in Cleveland.

Nope. According to MLB.com’s Mark Feinsand, he’s going with Josh Bard.

Bard, 39, was a teammate of Boone’s with the Indians in 2005. He’s not without coaching experience, having spent the last two seasons as the Dodgers’ bullpen coach, but he’s not that Gene Lamont/Don Zimmer-type we often see in the bench coach role.

Which is fine because different managers want different things from their bench coach. Some are strategy guys, helping with in-game decision making. Others are relationship guys who help managers understand all of the dynamics of the clubhouse while they’re worrying more about lineups and stuff. Others are trust guys, who can serve as the manager’s sounding board, among other things. Some are combinations of all of these things. As Feinsand notes in his story, Boone said at his introductory press conference that he’s looking for this:

“I want smart sitting next to me. I want confidence sitting next to me. I want a guy who can walk out into that room and as I talk about relationships I expect to have with my players, I expect that even to be more so with my coaching staff. Whether that is a guy with all kinds of experience or little experience. I am not concerned about that.”