Where’s Waldo Tim McClelland?

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Reader 1943mrmojorisin1971 alerted me to a play I didn’t see last night.  Rangers-Angels game. Seventh inning. Angels up 2-1, Mike Trout on third and Kendrys Morales at the plate.  Morales lifts a fly ball to right and Nelson Cruz fields it.  Trout tags up and races home.  The call … safe! Angels score what proved to be the game-winning run.  Watch the play here.

Catcher Yorvit Torrealba freaked out, thinking he made the play and was ejected almost immediately.  To be fair, it was close.  You gotta give the ump the benefit of the doubt there, right?

Well, maybe you do if home plate Tim McClelland is anywhere near the freakin’ play:

source:

Yes, that’s cropped, but watch the play and you see that McClelland is a good three feet outside of the circle on the grass off to the right in the pic. Torrelaba mentioned that after the game too, saying “I was trying to block the plate, but I don’t think he was in the right position to tell if he was out or safe,” which — though 100% correct — may be enough to get him a small fine on top of his ejection.

Missed calls happen. But there are ways to limit the number of missed calls.  One of them is by having the umpire in position to make them. In this case, that didn’t happen.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.