Where’s Waldo Tim McClelland?

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Reader 1943mrmojorisin1971 alerted me to a play I didn’t see last night.  Rangers-Angels game. Seventh inning. Angels up 2-1, Mike Trout on third and Kendrys Morales at the plate.  Morales lifts a fly ball to right and Nelson Cruz fields it.  Trout tags up and races home.  The call … safe! Angels score what proved to be the game-winning run.  Watch the play here.

Catcher Yorvit Torrealba freaked out, thinking he made the play and was ejected almost immediately.  To be fair, it was close.  You gotta give the ump the benefit of the doubt there, right?

Well, maybe you do if home plate Tim McClelland is anywhere near the freakin’ play:

source:

Yes, that’s cropped, but watch the play and you see that McClelland is a good three feet outside of the circle on the grass off to the right in the pic. Torrelaba mentioned that after the game too, saying “I was trying to block the plate, but I don’t think he was in the right position to tell if he was out or safe,” which — though 100% correct — may be enough to get him a small fine on top of his ejection.

Missed calls happen. But there are ways to limit the number of missed calls.  One of them is by having the umpire in position to make them. In this case, that didn’t happen.

Report: MLB likely to unilaterally implement pace of play changes

Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images
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ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick reports that talks between Major League Baseball and the MLB Players’ Association concerning pace of play changes have stalled, which makes it more likely that commissioner Rob Manfred unilaterally implements the changes he seeks. Those changes include a pitch clock and a restriction on catcher mound visits.

Manfred said, “My preferred path is a negotiated agreement with the players. But if we can’t get an agreement, we are going to have rule changes in 2018, one way or the other.”

The players have made several suggestions aimed at reducing the length of games, such as amending replay review rules, strictly monitoring down time between innings, and bringing back bullpen carts.

It is believed that MLB is proposing a pitch clock of 20 seconds. If a pitcher takes too long between pitches, he will have a ball added to the count. If the hitter takes too long, then he will have a strike added to the count.