What they’re saying about Johan Santana’s no-hitter

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No, it wasn’t a dream.

Johan Santana made a little history last night by tossing the first Mets’ no-hitter as part of an 8-0 win over the Cardinals. Here’s some reaction from around the baseball world:

R.A. Dickey, via New York Newsday: “We’re all talking about it,” referencing Mets manager Terry Collins. “What’s he going to do? Is he going to take him out? We’re all playing manager. And to a man, we all agreed that he’d have to rip the ball out of our hands.”

Mets manager Terry Collins, via New York Newsday: “I wanted it for him. I wanted it for the organization. But you just don’t jeopardize his career or the whole organization for one inning. We’ll wait five days and see how he is.”

Marty Noble of MLB.com: “All right, now what? What do we wait for now that hell is chilly and a Mets pitcher has thrown a no-hitter? What void do we now need to see filled to feel more baseball-content? Man walked on the moon before the Mets won a World Series, supporting Casey Stengel’s premise. But Armstrong’s giant leap barely preceded Cleon’s final-play catch. And that was merely NASA responding to Casey’s challenge. This was different, a greater challenge in some ways. NASA fought gravity and then no gravity. Johan Santana was against history, karma, the odds, medical advice, pitch-count concerns, an iffy forecast and the best-hitting team in the National League this season.”

Cardinals manager Mike Matheny, via MLB.com: “That’s the way the game goes,” said Matheny, referencing the blown call by third base umpire Adrian Johnson. “We’re not going to sit here and cry about it. You could tell at the time that we thought it was a hit. More important than breaking up a no-hitter was that it was a chance to get a man in scoring position. We’re not spending any time talking about that.”

Cardinals third base coach Jose Oquendo, via MLB.com: “Sometimes those plays go your way and sometimes they go against you,” said Oquendo, referencing Johnson’s missed call. “That’s part of it. I know he’s doing his best. There’s nothing we can do about it.”

Josh Thole, via the New York Times: “Being part of this organization, they deserve one — they deserve more than one. All the great pitchers that have come through here, including Johan, you would think somewhere along the line. But I’m sitting back there calling pitches, and you realize how hard this is. These guys that call perfect games, my goodness, how do you do it?”

Red Sox manager Bobby Valentine, via the Associated Press: “I’m really happy for them. That’s been an albatross over the pitching in that franchise forever, since `62. One of the best pitchers they’ve ever had threw it and that also gives credibility to it.”

Mike Baxter, via New York Newsday: “I’m glad I had a chance to be a part of that. It’s an honor to be able to make the play for Johan, but ultimately it was his night.”

David Wright, via New York Newsday: “Man, that was awesome. Short of Tom Seaver , I can’t think of a better person to pitch the first one.”

Jose Reyes, via the Palm Beach Post: “I need to send a text message to congratulate him. That’s the first one in Mets history. That’s huge for them.”

Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez, via the Associated Press: “What pride! Long live Venezuela!”

Johan Santana’s post-game speech to teammates, via MetsBlog: “Tonight we all made history. That’s all that matters. Thanks to you guys, because you guys make it happen. I was just doing my job, and having fun.”

Matthew Leach of MLB.com: “Finally, at 9:48 p.m. ET on a rainy Friday night in Queens, it all gave way to relief and exultation. Fifty-one years of waiting came to an end, thanks to the reconstituted left shoulder of a beloved 33-year-old Venezuelan. No matter what happens in the rest of Santana’s career, he has a moment and a central place in Mets lore.”

Report: Red Sox, Yankees have contacted Marlins about Martin Prado

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With just over a month to go before the July 31 non-waiver trade deadline, trade rumors are beginning to crop up. According to Bob Nightengale of USA TODAY Sports, the Red Sox and Yankees have each reached out to the Marlins about infielder Martin Prado.

The Marlins enter play Wednesday 35-40 and in third place in the NL East. They are expected to continue to sell after trading shortstop Adeiny Hechavarria to the Rays. However, as the club itself is in the middle of rumors with a handful of prospective new owners, major pieces like Giancarlo Stanton and Christian Yelich probably won’t be moved until that is settled.

Prado, 33, is hitting .277/.299/.398 with two home runs and nine RBI in 87 plate appearances. He has played in only 21 games due to calf and hamstring injuries. When he’s healthy, though, he is typically productive and he can play all four infield positions as well as the outfield corners. Prado is under contract for the next two seasons as well, at $13.5 million and $15 million.

With either the Red Sox or Yankees, Prado would likely assume third base. The Red Sox have gotten a major league-worst .562 out of its third basemen while the Yankees have gotten a .678 OPS, 24th out of 30 teams.

Carl Edwards, Jr.’s reason for skipping the Cubs’ visit to the White House is… interesting

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The Cubs oddly made an extra visit to the White House on Tuesday. After winning the World Series, the team visited then-President Barack Obama — a Chicago sports fan — in January before he left office. But they went back today for an “informal” visit with President Trump.

The Cubs, however, have ties to the Republican party and to Trump. The Ricketts family are Republican donors and Cubs owner Tom’s brother Todd was Trump’s nominee for deputy secretary of commerce. Manager Joe Maddon is also longtime friends with Lou Barletta, the Republican representative from Hazleton, PA.

Some players chose not to join their Cubs teammates for a trip to the White House. 10 players, to be exact, according to Gordon Wittenmyer of the Chicago Sun-Times. None of those players declining to go offered a political reason, understandably so. But reliever Carl Edwards, Jr.’s excuse made a lot of sense. He said, “I’m trying to go see like the dinosaur museums.” Indeed, Edwards could have spent the afternoon at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago.

Other players declining to visit the White House included Jake Arrieta, Hector Rondon, Jason Heyward, Pedro Strop, Justin Grimm, and Addison Russell.