Settling the Score: Friday’s results

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Not sure if you’ve heard about him, but this Mike Trout fellow is pretty dang good.

The 20-year-old was in the middle of everything again last night, going 2-for-4 with a triple and three RBI in a 4-2 win over the AL West leading Rangers.

Trout got the Angels on the board in the bottom of the sixth inning with an RBI triple and then scored the tying run on a single by Albert Pujols. After making an excellent running catch to end a scoring threat in the top of the seventh, Trout put the Angels in front by dumping a two-run single in center field.

Jerome Williams did his part by allowing two runs over seven innings while Scott Downs and Ernesto Frieri each pitched a scoreless inning of relief to lock down the victory.

The Angels have nine wins in their last 11 games and now sit at 27-26 on the season, just 4 1/2 games behind the Rangers. Of course, Trout has been a big part of their recent resurgence, hitting .309/.370/.537 with five home runs, seven doubles, three triples, 19 RBI, eight stolen bases and a .906 OPS in 31 games since being called up from the minors in late April.

Your Friday box scores:

Marlins 4, Phillies 6

Yankees 9, Tigers 4

Twins 1, Indians 7

Cardinals 0, Mets 8

Red Sox 7, Blue Jays 2

Reds 4, Astros 1

Orioles 0, Rays 5

Pirates 8, Brewers 2

Mariners 4, White Sox 7

Dodgers 3, Rockies 13

Athletics 0, Royals 2

Diamondbacks 1, Padres 7

Cubs 3, Giants 4

Braves/Nationals – PPD

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.