Everything Frank McCourt touches goes bankrupt

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I saw that the Dewey & LeBoeuf law firm is folding. That’s huge news and the latest indication of just how farkakte the economics of the legal business are.  But I had forgotten who D&L’s most recent high profile client was. Here’s Steve Dilbeck of the L.A. Times:

News has come from back east that the law firm of Dewey & LeBoeuf is filing for bankruptcy. Besides the little detail that this is the largest law firm to go under in U.S. history, there is this one other notable fact: The law firm going bankrupt is the same law firm that handled Frank McCourt’s bankruptcy of the Dodgers … Hey, I know a guy flush with $1 billion who might be able to give Dewey a loan. You could argue he even owes them.

Sadly, we can’t pin this on McCourt. Rather, we can pin it on a ridiculous compensation system that has law firm partners promising themselves insane draws despite the fact that revenues won’t support it anymore because business clients aren’t as dumb as to simply rubber stamp every legal bill that comes in to the accounting office like they did back in the 80s.

Mamas, don’t let your babies grow up to be corporate lawyers …

Padres sign Jordan Lyles

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The Padres announced on Sunday that the club signed pitcher Jordan Lyles to a one-year major league contract with a club option for 2019. According to Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports, Lyles will earn $750,000 in 2018. Pitcher Travis Wood was designated for assignment to create room on the 40-man roster for Lyles.

Lyles, 27, had miserable results between the Rockies and Padres last season, compiling an aggregate 7.75 ERA with a 55/22 K/BB ratio over 69 2/3 innings. While he specifically gave up 24 earned runs in 23 innings across five starts with the Padres, it was a small sample. A full season at the pitcher-friendly Petco Park, as opposed to Colorado’s Coors Field, might help revitalize his career.

Wood, 30, went to the Padres at the non-waiver trade deadline from the Royals this past season. Overall, the lefty posted an aggregate 6.80 ERA with a 65/45 K/BB ratio in 94 innings. He’ll earn $6.5 million this season and has an $8 million mutual option with a $1 million buyout for 2019. So, the Padres are just eating $7.5 million minus the league minimum, assuming Wood latches on elsewhere.