Great Moments in Chutzpah: Curt Schilling speaks


Curt Schilling has spent many years promoting conservative candidates and causes and styled himself a champion of private enterprise, limited spending and self-reliance. Good for him. Even if I don’t agree with his political views, I do not believe that anyone has a monopoly on wisdom and I respect those views as a legitimate alternative to the things I believe. Noble opposition if you will.

However, just as there are no atheists in foxholes, there are no conservatives when business is poor.  And as for responsibility and self-reliance? Well, Curt Schilling is not a big fan of those things these days:

In his first public remarks on the company’s problems, Schilling told the newspaper for its Tuesday editions that public remarks by Gov. Lincoln Chafee that the state was trying to keep his company solvent were “devastating.” He said that shortly after those remarks, a video-game publisher pulled out of a deal to finance a new game.

“The governor is not operating in the best interest of the company by any stretch, or the taxpayers, or the state,” Schilling told the newspaper. “We’re trying to save this company and we’re working 24/7. The public commentary has been as big a piece of what’s happening to us as anything out there.”

Yes, it’s the government’s fault for daring to speak when you defaulted on your obligations, Schilling. Obligations you made in order to receive breaks and incentives from that same government.  Don’t like the spotlight? Tough. As The Common Man wrote earlier today, you live by your fame and personal brand, you die by it too.

And either way: if you think taking handouts from the government is a bad idea, don’t take them. And if you do, don’t complain when the government gets somewhat antagonistic with you.

Report: Athletics sign Trevor Cahill to one-year deal

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Free agent right-hander Trevor Cahill reportedly has a one-year deal in place with the Athletics, according to’s Jane Lee. The exact terms have yet to be disclosed, and as the agreement is still pending a physical, it has not been formally announced by the club.

Cahill, 30, is coming off of a decent, albeit underwhelming year with the Padres and Royals. He kicked off the 2017 season with a 4-3 record in 11 starts for the Padres, then split his time between the rotation and bullpen after a midseason trade to the Royals. By the end of the year, the righty led the league with 16 wild pitches and had racked up a 4.93 ERA, 4.8 BB/9 and 9.3 SO/9 in 84 innings for the two teams.

The A’s found themselves in desperate need of rotation depth this week after Jharel Cotton announced he’d miss the 2018 season to undergo Tommy John surgery. Right now, the team is considering some combination of Andrew Triggs, Daniel Gossett, Daniel Mengden and Paul Blackburn for the back end of the rotation — a mix that seems unlikely to change in the last two weeks before Opening Day, as Lee points out that Cahill won’t be ready to shoulder a full workload by then. Instead, he’s expected to begin the year in the bullpen and work his way up to a starting role, where the A’s hope he’ll replicate the All-Star numbers he produced with them back in 2010.