Great Moments in Chutzpah: Curt Schilling speaks

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Curt Schilling has spent many years promoting conservative candidates and causes and styled himself a champion of private enterprise, limited spending and self-reliance. Good for him. Even if I don’t agree with his political views, I do not believe that anyone has a monopoly on wisdom and I respect those views as a legitimate alternative to the things I believe. Noble opposition if you will.

However, just as there are no atheists in foxholes, there are no conservatives when business is poor.  And as for responsibility and self-reliance? Well, Curt Schilling is not a big fan of those things these days:

In his first public remarks on the company’s problems, Schilling told the newspaper for its Tuesday editions that public remarks by Gov. Lincoln Chafee that the state was trying to keep his company solvent were “devastating.” He said that shortly after those remarks, a video-game publisher pulled out of a deal to finance a new game.

“The governor is not operating in the best interest of the company by any stretch, or the taxpayers, or the state,” Schilling told the newspaper. “We’re trying to save this company and we’re working 24/7. The public commentary has been as big a piece of what’s happening to us as anything out there.”

Yes, it’s the government’s fault for daring to speak when you defaulted on your obligations, Schilling. Obligations you made in order to receive breaks and incentives from that same government.  Don’t like the spotlight? Tough. As The Common Man wrote earlier today, you live by your fame and personal brand, you die by it too.

And either way: if you think taking handouts from the government is a bad idea, don’t take them. And if you do, don’t complain when the government gets somewhat antagonistic with you.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.