Great Moments in Chutzpah: Curt Schilling speaks

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Curt Schilling has spent many years promoting conservative candidates and causes and styled himself a champion of private enterprise, limited spending and self-reliance. Good for him. Even if I don’t agree with his political views, I do not believe that anyone has a monopoly on wisdom and I respect those views as a legitimate alternative to the things I believe. Noble opposition if you will.

However, just as there are no atheists in foxholes, there are no conservatives when business is poor.  And as for responsibility and self-reliance? Well, Curt Schilling is not a big fan of those things these days:

In his first public remarks on the company’s problems, Schilling told the newspaper for its Tuesday editions that public remarks by Gov. Lincoln Chafee that the state was trying to keep his company solvent were “devastating.” He said that shortly after those remarks, a video-game publisher pulled out of a deal to finance a new game.

“The governor is not operating in the best interest of the company by any stretch, or the taxpayers, or the state,” Schilling told the newspaper. “We’re trying to save this company and we’re working 24/7. The public commentary has been as big a piece of what’s happening to us as anything out there.”

Yes, it’s the government’s fault for daring to speak when you defaulted on your obligations, Schilling. Obligations you made in order to receive breaks and incentives from that same government.  Don’t like the spotlight? Tough. As The Common Man wrote earlier today, you live by your fame and personal brand, you die by it too.

And either way: if you think taking handouts from the government is a bad idea, don’t take them. And if you do, don’t complain when the government gets somewhat antagonistic with you.

Sean Manaea pitches the first no-hitter of 2018

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Athletics southpaw Sean Manaea delivered his first career no-hitter against the Red Sox in a decisive 3-0 victory on Saturday night. Any thought of a perfect game was banished in the first at-bat, when Mookie Betts drew a leadoff six-pitch walk to open the first inning. From there, Manaea was nearly flawless, holding the Sox to four total baserunners and striking out 10 of 30 batters faced — a career record.

Manaea was gifted a three-run lead thanks to RBI doubles from Jed Lowrie and Stephen Piscotty and Marcus Semien‘s solo shot off of Chris Sale in the fifth inning. While the Red Sox managed to draw two walks off of Manaea, they didn’t come anywhere close to plating a run. Andrew Benintendi tried to break up the no-no in the sixth inning with an infield hit down the first base line, but strayed out of bounds and later saw his hit reversed on a call of batter interference.

Entering the ninth inning, the 26-year-old lefty was sitting at just 95 pitches through eight frames of no-hit ball. He quickly deposed Blake Swihart and Mookie Betts with a groundout and fly out, then walked Benintendi on seven pitches. Any threat the Red Sox might have posed was soon eliminated, however, as Hanley Ramirez ground into a force out to complete the no-hitter.

Manaea is the first A’s pitcher to toss a no-no since Dallas Braden’s perfect game against the Rays eight years ago. The last time the Red Sox were on the losing end of a no-hitter was also against an AL West rival, when the Mariners’ Chris Bosio clinched a 2-0 no-no on April 22, 1993. Manaea’s feat is even more outstanding given how dominant the Red Sox have looked this season: prior to Saturday’s defeat, they boasted a 17-2 record and had yet to be shut out during the regular season.