Roy Halladay exits after two innings with sore shoulder


It’s panic time in Philadelphia: Roy Halladay was forced from his start Sunday against the Cardinals after two innings due to a sore shoulder.

Halladay gave up a grand slam to Yadier Molina in the first inning of the contest. He rebounded to work a perfect second inning, but Pete Orr was sent up to pinch-hit for him in the bottom of the inning. St. Louis went on to win the game 8-3.

The Phillies said removing Halladay was a precautionary measure. He’ll be re-evaluated in the next couple of days. No MRI is planned, according to Jim Salisbury of

If Halladay lands on the DL, it’d be his first trip there as a member of the Phillies. He spent 16 days on the DL with the Blue Jays in 2009 due to a groin strain. The last time he went on the DL with an arm problem was 2004, when he missed two months with a shoulder strain.

Halladay was coming off a loss to Washington in which he gave up five runs in six innings. Including the slam today, he’s given up five homers in his last three starts, covering 16 innings. Last year, he surrendered a total of 10 homers in 233 2/3 innings. Given his diminished velocity and occasionally diminished movement, it’d come as no surprise to learn that his shoulder has been barking for a while now.

Henderson Alvarez signs with Tigres de Quintana Roo

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Free agent right-hander Henderson Alvarez signed a deal with the Tigres de Quintana Roo of the Mexican Baseball League earlier this week, FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman reported Friday. The righty wasn’t necessarily too fringey a player to hack it in the big leagues, but there were no MLB takers in attendance during his showcase in Venezuela last month and he clearly felt it best to try his luck elsewhere.

The 27-year-old’s last major league gig came with the Phillies, for whom he delivered a 4.30 ERA, 6.8 BB/9 and 3.7 SO/9 over 14 2/3 innings in 2017. While he’s not too far removed from his first and only All-Star bid in 2014, he was besieged by shoulder issues in 2015 and 2016 and underwent season-ending surgeries as a result.

That added injury risk, coupled with the fact that he hasn’t pitched more than 22 innings in a single season since 2014, may have been too much for major league teams to take on this spring. Assuming he steers clear of further injuries, however, a return to the majors may not be entirely out of the question in years to come.