Things got a little tense between Cliff Lee and Shane Victorino last night

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The Phillies defeated the Cardinals 5-3 in 10 innings last night thanks to a go-ahead two-run homer by Hunter Pence. The big takeaway is that the Phillies have won three in a row and now sit one game over .500 (24-23) on the year, but the game featured an interesting moment after Shane Victorino was involved in a pair of defensive miscues in the bottom of the fourth inning.

After the Phillies got back to the dugout for the top of the fifth, Cliff Lee and Victorino exchanged some heated words. The pair didn’t come close to blows, but teammate Brian Schneider stepped in the way to prevent the situation from escalating. You can watch video of the disagreement here.

According to Jim Salisbury of CSNPhilly.com, neither would confirm whether the argument was over the pair of dropped fly balls.

“It’s going to stay between us,” Lee said. “I’m not going to talk about it.”
Victorino would not talk about it either.
“Just go,” he said brusquely, waving a reporter away from his locker.

Two highly-competitive people getting into an argument is hardly shocking and Lee was likely just blowing off some steam. Can you really blame the guy? Despite an excellent 2.82 ERA and 47/8 K/BB ratio over his first eight starts, the 33-year-old southpaw is still searching for his first win this season.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.