Roy Halladay says Carlos Ruiz is the Phillies’ best player; says the Phillies have great chemistry

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Roy Halladay spoke at length with the media after last night’s loss. A lot of Phillies fans sent me the article quoting him because of the stuff he said about the state of the team and all of that.  It’s interesting in its own right because Halladay has never been the most loquacious player.

But I found his stuff about Carlos Ruiz’s ejection for arguing balls and strikes while on defense the most interesting:

“He didn’t turn around, he didn’t get in his face, he didn’t use obscene language,” Halladay said. “He simply said the pitch was a strike. He said it a couple times. I don’t know. I’ve never seen one like that before. And it’s unfortunate, because he’s our best player and he gets run out of the game, really for saying a pitch is a strike. I’ve never seen one like that.

David Murphy noted his surprise at the quote, as it’s rare that you hear someone calling Chooch the Phillies’ “best player.”  He may very well be given how well he’s hitting at a premium defensive position, but it’s not something you hear very often. As Murphy says, you hear a lot of Ruiz being underrated or important or that he’s the “heart and soul,” but a flat-out declaration that he’s “the best” is interesting.

Also interesting: Halladay said the Phillies have “great chemistry.” Which is something people rarely say about a team that’s struggling. It’s usually some post-hoc description of a team that’s doing great, with the chemistry being the result of the relaxation that comes from success.  I usually call b.s. on that, but I think it’s way more significant when it comes from a player as opposed to a reporter. And way more significant when it happens when things aren’t going well as opposed to when they are.

Clayton Kershaw struggles with control, walks six Marlins

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Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw entered Wednesday night’s start against the Marlins without having issued a walk in his previous three starts. In fact, his last walk came on April 3 when he issued a free pass to Paul Goldschmidt with the bases empty and two outs in the bottom of the first inning. All told, Kershaw was on a streak of 26 walk-less innings before he took the mound at home to take on the Marlins.

Kershaw started off Wednesday in character, striking out the side in the first inning. He issued a walk in a tough second inning, but escaped without allowing a run. Kershaw walked two more in the third and again danced out of danger. In the fourth, Kershaw walked Lewis Brinson to load the bases with no outs and — you guessed it — didn’t end up allowing a run. His errant control finally came back to bite him in the fifth when Kershaw issued back-to-back two-out walks, then served up a three-run home run to Miguel Rojas down the left field line. His night was done when he completed the inning. Five innings, three runs, five hits, six walks, seven strikeouts, 112 pitches.

The six walks Kershaw issued over five innings marked his first six-walk outing since April 7, 2010 when he issued six free passes to the Pirates in 4 2/3 innings. The only other time he walked as many was on August 3, 2009 against the Brewers in a four-plus inning outing. Kershaw hasn’t even walked five batters in an outing recently — the last time was September 23, 2012 against the Reds.