Rockies owner says Tracy, O’Dowd not fall guys

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Remember when the Colorado Rockies went to the World Series? That was only five years ago, but it seems like 500 the way the Rockies play these days.

Only the Chicago Cubs (15-28) have a worse record than Colorado (15-27), which lost its sixth straight game on Tuesday.

Nonetheless, club owner Dick Monfort isn’t preparing to make any big changes, and expressed his full support for both manager Jim Tracy and general manager Dan O’Dowd in an interview with Patrick Saunders of The Denver Post .

“I have had people get in my face and say, ‘You’ve got to do this and do that.’ And believe me, I understand the fans’ frustration,” Monfort told The Denver Post on Tuesday. “I know everybody wants a fall guy and everybody wants blood. I just don’t think it’s appropriate to do.”

Monfort went on to say that if there is anyone to blame, it’s him, and it’s possible he became too in love with his own players, though “I don’t believe that’s the case.”

The Rockies are a franchise that prides itself in fostering a culture of strong character. But maybe this franchise is simply too nice from the top down, when it could use some tough decisions both with management and with player personnel.

Then again, the Rockies are 4-16 this month. Maybe this is the dreaded vote of confidence.

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Javier Baez: “This is a game. It’s not as serious as a lot of people take it.”

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Infielder Javier Baez is back in camp with the Cubs after helping Puerto Rico to a second-place finish in the 2017 World Baseball Classic. He was the focal point of what was, to many, the most memorable play of the entire tournament: Baez pointed at catcher Yadier Molina, who was attempting to throw out a would-be base-stealer, before applying the tag for the final out of the eighth inning.

While Baez didn’t receive much criticism for his theatrics, aside from an insignificant handful of spoilsports, he is one of the players who most exemplifies the emotional, celebratory culture that foreign players bring to Major League Baseball. U.S. (and Tigers) second baseman Ian Kinsler is on the other side of that spectrum, as he said prior to the WBC final that he hopes kids mimic the solemn way U.S. players play the game rather than the emotional, passionate way players from Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic play the game.

Baez isn’t about to apologize for the way he and his teammates play the game. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney, Baez said, “We do a great job playing and having fun out there. That’s what it’s all about. This is a game. It’s not as serious as a lot of people take it. but, you know, everybody’s got their style and their talent. I have a lot of fun.”

He continued, “It’s their choice to look at how we play, how excited we get. To us, it’s really huge what we did, even though we didn’t win. All of Puerto Rico got really together. We were going through a hard time over there and everything got fixed up for at least three weeks. Hopefully, they keep it like that.”

Mike Trout proposes change to spring training umpiring

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Angels outfielder Mike Trout came up with an idea that would allow less experienced umpires an opportunity to call some major league spring training action. As ESPN’s Buster Olney reports, Trout thinks the veteran umpires should only call five or six innings as they get back into regular season shape. The rest of the innings could be called by minor league umpires.

According to Olney, baseball officials loved Trout’s idea when they heard about it last week. One official said, “It makes a lot of sense for a lot of different reasons.” Another said, “That’s Trout — he’s always paying attention to stuff beyond what he’s doing.”

Of course, I have to agree that the suggestion is a great one. As Olney notes, the turnover rate for umpires every year is relatively low, so younger, less-experienced umpires have few opportunities to get a feel for what it’s like calling major league action. Even beyond the actual interpretation of the rules, interacting with big league personalities would also be helpful for minor league umpires.