Lance Berkman leaves game with serious-looking knee injury

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The Cardinals are suddenly taking punches.

First baseman Lance Berkman had to be helped off the field Saturday night at Dodger Stadium after losing his balance while stretching for a throw from shortstop Rafael Furcal. It appeared that his right knee buckled under him, and he was clearly in pain as he carefully made his way into the dugout aided by trainer Chris Conroy and manager Mike Matheny.

Berkman has undergone four different knee procedures — two to each knee — in his major league career, but he wasn’t able to make a quick diagnosis of this particular injury. It felt different than the kind of issues he’s dealt with in the past.

“It doesn’t feel right,” Berkman told reporters, including MLB.com’s Jen Langosch. “I wish I knew more than that. … I didn’t feel a pop. [The joint] just kind of slid on me a little bit. That’s the best way I can describe it.”

The Cardinals are concerned enough about his status that they removed first base prospect Matt Adams in the fifth inning of Triple-A Memphis’ game (and presumably told him to get on the next flight to Los Angeles). Adams, a promising 23-year-old, was batting .340/.375/.603 with nine home runs in 37 games this year at the Triple-A level. He slugged 32 home runs in 115 games last season at Double-A Springfield.

St. Louis has lost three straight games. Sunday’s series finale with the Dodgers will be broadcast on ESPN.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.