Cubs patriarch Joe Ricketts is in need of “a literate” black man

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Remember Joe Ricketts? He’s the patriarch of the Ricketts family which owns the Chicago Cubs. His son Tom runs the team, but old Joe’s fortune — made founding Ameritrade — is what built the family’s nest egg.

As we’ve noted before, Joe Ricketts is quite the political activist. He is the founder and leader of an anti-government spending group called “Ending Spending.” Never mind that his family business asked for and received millions for a new spring training facility in Arizona and continues to ask for tax dollars to renovate Wrigley Field. He’s really, really against spending. At least spending that benefits people other than himself and his family.

But now he’s branched out and is bankrolling efforts aimed directly at unseating President Obama.  Which is fine as far as it goes, but as the New York Times notes today, the kind of rhetoric he’s bankrolling is … interesting:

The $10 million plan, one of several being studied by Mr. Ricketts, includes preparations for how to respond to the charges of race-baiting it envisions if it highlights Mr. Obama’s former ties to Mr. Wright, who espouses what is known as “black liberation theology.”

The group suggested hiring as a spokesman an “extremely literate conservative African-American” who can argue that Mr. Obama misled the nation by presenting himself as what the proposal calls a “metrosexual, black Abe Lincoln.

Theory: if you specify that you need a “literate” black person — like you need to specify that you don’t want one of those many illiterate ones — you probably do need to “respond to charges of race-baiting,” because you probably are engaging in a bunch of racist baloney.

Anyway, it’s an interesting article. And a reminder that the patriarch of the Chicago Cubs is going to spend millions of his money to make people believe that Obama is an extreme radical black man out to undermine the American Way. If that’s something you believe, great. If not, perhaps a literate black man will change your mind.

Oh, and Joe: have you paid for Shawon Dunston’s college education yet? You don’t want him to be illiterate, do you?

Alex Dickerson to miss 2017 season after undergoing back surgery

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Padres’ outfielder Alex Dickerson won’t see PETCO Park anytime soon — at least, not as its starting left fielder. The 27-year-old was diagnosed with a bulging disc in his lower back prior to the start of the 2017 season, and hasn’t made any kind of substantial progress in the months since. According to Dennis Lin of the San Diego Union-Tribune, he suffered a setback in his recovery process last week and is set to undergo a season-ending discectomy next Wednesday.

Over 285 plate appearances, Dickerson batted .257/.333/.455 with 10 home runs and a .788 OPS for the Padres in 2016. He missed several days with a right hip contusion last July, but hasn’t experienced any substantial health problems since undergoing surgery in 2014 to repair a torn ligament in his left ankle.

The expected recovery period for lower back surgery is 3-4 months, according to Lin, which puts Dickerson’s estimated return just a few days before the end of the regular season. The Padres aren’t scraping the bottom of the NL West, but their 29-44 record doesn’t bode well for a postseason run this year. Assuming Dickerson rehabs his back in a timely manner, he should be in fine form to enter the competition for left field next spring.

Video: Hanley Ramirez’s No. 250 career home run barely left the field

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Hanley Ramirez played a pivotal role during the Red Sox’ 9-4 win over the Angels on Friday night, crushing a two-run homer off of Alex Meyer to bring the Sox up to a four-run lead in the fourth inning.

Well, crushed might be the wrong word. The ball cleared the right field fence with a mere 350 feet, landing just beyond Pesky’s Pole to bring Ramirez’s career home run total to an even 250.

According to the ESPN Home Run Tracker, Ramirez’s milestone blast wasn’t the shortest home run of the year — not by a long shot. That distinction currently belongs to Rays’ outfielder Corey Dickerson, who skimmed the left field fence at Rogers Centre with a 326-foot homer back in April.