Orioles’ investment in Wei-Yin Chen is paying off early

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In an effort to boost a rotation that had MLB’s worst ERA last season the Orioles brought in a pair of starters who’d thrived in Japan, signing Wei-Yin Chen for $11.3 million and Tsuyoshi Wada for $8.15 million.

Wada experienced elbow problems early in spring training and will miss the entire season following Tommy John surgery, but Chen is looking like an excellent investment so far.

Last night he tossed seven innings of two-run ball against the Yankees, out-dueling CC Sabathia and improving to 4-0 with a 2.45 ERA in seven starts. His secondary numbers aren’t quite as impressive with a modest 32/14 K/BB ratio in 44 innings, but Chen has allowed just three homers and has proven very capable of success against strong lineups.

Of those seven starts two have come against the Yankees and he’s faced the Rangers and Red Sox once apiece. Those are the three highest-scoring teams in the American League and the 26-year-old left-hander has a 2.84 ERA against them despite averaging just 90.1 miles per hour with his fastball.

Must-Click Link: Sherri Nichols, Sabermetic Pioneer

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If you are old enough and lame enough as I am, you may have lurked around on sabermetic message boards in the 1990s. If you did, you may have heard of Sherri Nichols, who back in the day, was a significant contributor to the advancement of statistical analysis, particularly defensive analysis.

While it’s probably better that not everyone is as old and nerdy as me, the downside of it is that most people haven’t heard of Nichols and know nothing about her contributions. That changes today with Ben Lindbergh’s excellent analysis of Nichols and her work over at The Ringer, which I recommend that you all read.

The short version: Nichols is the one who planted the seed about on-base percentage being valuable in the mind of Baseball Prospectus Founder Gary Huckabay, back in the late 80s. She’s also the one most responsible for the rise of zone-based defensive metrics in the 1990s, such as Defensive Average, which she created and which served as the basis for other such metrics going forward. She also played a critical role in the development of RetroSheet, which collected almost all extant box score and play-by-play information going back to the turn of the 20th century, thereby making so much of the information available at Baseball-Reference.com and FanGraphs possible. A key contribution there: making the information free and available to everyone, rather than closing the underlying data off as proprietary and either charging for access or keeping it in-house like some recent data collectors have chosen to do. Ahem.

A larger takeaway than all of Nichols’ contributions is just how loathe the baseball community was to listen to a woman back then. I mean, yeah, they’re still loathe to listen to women now, as indicated by the small number of women who hold jobs in baseball operations departments, but back then it was even worse, as evidenced by Lindbergh’s stories and Nichols’ anecdotes.

A great read and a great history lesson.