Troy Tulowitzki left last night’s game after being nailed in the leg with a foul ball

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Troy Tulowitzki is listed as day-to-day after getting smacked in the leg with a Dexter Fowler foul ball as he stood on the top step of the dugout last night:

“I had no chance,” said Tulowitzki, who briefly tried to remain the game before being replaced for a pinch runner after reaching base on a one-out infield single in the same inning he was hit. “Usually when a ball’s hit like that, it’s kind of off the end or jammed or something like that. That was a line drive. I really don’t even know how it’s possible but it happened to hit. Just bad luck.”

Actually, good luck. His manager said that it just missed hitting his kneecap.  And after what happened to Jeff Niemann last night, it was good fortune that kept Tulowitzki from something far worse than what he sustained.

The Hall of Fame rejected the BBWAA vote to make ballots public

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Last year, at the Winter Meetings, the BBWAA voted overwhelmingly to make Hall of Fame ballots public beginning with this year’s election. Their decision was a long-demanded one, and it served to make a process that has often frustrated fans — and many voters — more transparent.

Mark Feinsand of MLB.com tweeted a few minutes ago, however, that at some point since last December, the Hall of Fame rejected the BBWAA’s vote. Writers may continue to release their own ballots, but their votes will not automatically be made public.

I don’t know what the rationale could possibly be for the Hall of Fame. If I had to guess, I’d say that the less-active BBWAA voters who either voted against that change or who weren’t present for it because they don’t go to the Winter Meetings complained about it. It’s likewise possible that the Hall simply doesn’t want anyone talking about the votes and voters so as not to take attention away from the honorees and the institution, but that train left the station years ago. If the Hall doesn’t want people talking about votes and voters, they’d have to change the whole thing to some star chamber kind of process in which the voters themselves aren’t even known and no one discusses it publicly until after the results are released.

Oh well. There’s a lot the Hall of Fame does that doesn’t make a ton of sense. Add this to the list.