Quote of the Day: An absolute sick burn on the Braves and MLB

17 Comments

You may have seen a month or two ago that someone started selling red and blue t-shirts with the word “Barves” instead of “Braves.”  As most of those kinds of things go, it was kind of clever and it became fun to call the Braves the Barves on Twitter and stuff.

And, as most of those things go, you knew it was going to cause MLB and its lawyers to get in the act. And they recently did, sending out a cease and desist letter.  The makers of the shirts are desisting, because who needs that kind of legal hassle?

But it was almost worth it, if for no other reason than it led the Indian Country blog — which focuses on Native American news, culture and issues —  to report on the cease and desist letter thusly:

… the Barves logo and shirts, it said, “dilute and/or tarnish the distinctive quality of the Braves Marks. Accordingly …(it) constitutes trademark infringement, unfair competition, false designation of origin, and/or trademark dilution, in violation of federal, state and/or common law.”

Many Natives might concede that the MLB and the Braves have a point: You have to be careful when playing with logos and symbolism—you don’t want to dilute and/or tarnish anyone’s distinctive qualities.

That may be the sickest burn in the history of sick burns. I want to stand up and applaud the magnificent S.O.B. who wrote that right now.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

7 Comments

Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.