Judge at Roger Clemens trial refuses to strike Andy Pettitte’s testimony

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I think Andy Pettitte’s testimony actually helped Roger Clemens’ case rather than hurt it in that it introduced uncertainty and uncertainty is bad when you have the burden of proof.  Despite this, the defense moved to strike Pettitte’s testimony last week, arguing that it was contradictory, inconclusive and therefore useless. The judge ruled on that today and Clemens’ side lost:

U.S. District Judge Reggie Walton rejected a defense motion Monday to strike Pettitte’s testimony about a contested conversation a dozen years ago about human growth hormone. Pettitte testified two weeks ago that Clemens said he had used HGH – only to say under cross-examination he might have misunderstood their conversation.

Basically, the judge is going to allow the jury to infer what they may from the testimony. They could infer that Pettitte had no real knowledge of anything Clemens did. On the other hand they could infer that Clemens did in fact tell Pettitte that he used HGH and that he later lied about or Pettitte was covering for him or whatever (which is why the defense wanted to strike it, even if it wasn’t want the prosecution wanted Pettitte to say). It stands on its own for whatever it’s worth.

The judge also struck down the defense’s attempt to try to get Brian McNamee’s divorce records, calling it a “fishing expedition.”  Which is an insult to the certainty one usually finds in fishing expeditions.  Besides, this trial is now in week number five. Anything that gets it to the end quicker is a good thing, so hooray for the ruling.

Report: Nationals to interview Alex Cora for managerial position

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Nick Cafardo of the Boston Globe reports that the Nationals will ask to speak with Astros’ bench coach Alex Cora after the American League Championship Series concludes on Saturday. This comes on the heels of the news that club manager Dusty Baker will not be returning to the team in 2018.

Cora, 42, has some experience in the Nationals’ organization. He played for the Nats during his last big league stint in 2011, batting .224/.287/.276 through 91 games before announcing his retirement in the spring of 2012. Per Cafardo, he was also offered a player development gig with the club, but has not appeared in any kind of official role with them since his days as a major league infielder. While he’s been lauded for his leadership skills and strong clubhouse presence, he hasn’t acquired any managerial experience since his retirement, save for a handful of games with the Astros where he filled in for A.J. Hinch.

Despite the appeal of having a familiar face in the dugout, the Nationals aren’t the only ones eyeing Cora. The Astros’ coach has already interviewed with the Tigers, Mets and Red Sox this month. Boston appears to be the current favorite to land him and according to at least one source, may even announce his hiring in advance of the World Series next Tuesday.