Brian McNamee on Roger Clemens: “I was pretty much in charge of his body”

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Today, the prosecution in the Roger Clemens case finally, after four weeks of trial, put on their star witness: Brian McNamee. He’s still testifying as this post goes live.

The beef of it all: McNamee testified that he injected Roger Clemens with steroids about eight to 10 times when they both were with the Toronto Blue Jays.  He said Clemens supplied the PEDs, McNamee did the injecting.  In his overall training, however, McNamee was in charge. That quote in the headline was part of his testimony today.

Pfun Pfact: the first time McNamee ever saw steroids was when Jose Canseco, also with the Blue Jays, gave him some syringes wrapped in tin foil. Just thought that was interesting.

Anyway, the key here — that McNamee injected Clemens with what they both knew to be steroids — has been what McNamee has said all along. He is the only witness in this trial who has first-hand evidence of Clemens’ PED use. No one who testified in the Barry Bonds case had similar evidence against Bonds, for that matter.  It’s the fundamental difference between this prosecution and the Bonds prosecution, and the reason why Clemens faces substantially more legal risk than did Bonds, even with the prosecution seemingly stepping on its own feet so many times in the past couple of weeks.

But direct examination — which is what we got today — is only half the story.  McNammee will be cross-examined tomorrow. And, as we have noted many times, there is a lot the defense can fire at him to harm his credibility.  How he holds up to that cross examination will likely determine whether Roger Clemens is convicted or acquitted.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.