Brian McNamee on Roger Clemens: “I was pretty much in charge of his body”

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Today, the prosecution in the Roger Clemens case finally, after four weeks of trial, put on their star witness: Brian McNamee. He’s still testifying as this post goes live.

The beef of it all: McNamee testified that he injected Roger Clemens with steroids about eight to 10 times when they both were with the Toronto Blue Jays.  He said Clemens supplied the PEDs, McNamee did the injecting.  In his overall training, however, McNamee was in charge. That quote in the headline was part of his testimony today.

Pfun Pfact: the first time McNamee ever saw steroids was when Jose Canseco, also with the Blue Jays, gave him some syringes wrapped in tin foil. Just thought that was interesting.

Anyway, the key here — that McNamee injected Clemens with what they both knew to be steroids — has been what McNamee has said all along. He is the only witness in this trial who has first-hand evidence of Clemens’ PED use. No one who testified in the Barry Bonds case had similar evidence against Bonds, for that matter.  It’s the fundamental difference between this prosecution and the Bonds prosecution, and the reason why Clemens faces substantially more legal risk than did Bonds, even with the prosecution seemingly stepping on its own feet so many times in the past couple of weeks.

But direct examination — which is what we got today — is only half the story.  McNammee will be cross-examined tomorrow. And, as we have noted many times, there is a lot the defense can fire at him to harm his credibility.  How he holds up to that cross examination will likely determine whether Roger Clemens is convicted or acquitted.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.