Johnny Damon makes his Hall of Fame case

26 Comments

There aren’t many players who would willingly cite their own statistics in advocating their Hall of Fame case. But there aren’t many players like Johnny Damon.

Tyler Kepner of the New York Times asked Damon whether he feels he’s worthy of Cooperstown prior to Friday’s game:

“Yeah,” he responded. “I think even if you look at my numbers now, how high I am on the runs list, how high I am on the doubles list, and you also have to take into account the ballparks that I’ve played in. I’ve played in some pretty tough ones for left-handers. If I played in Yankee Stadium my whole career, my 230 home runs turn into 300, easy.”

Damon also said that “being a clean player” should further his case, though he wouldn’t necessarily shut all of the accused steroid users out of Cooperstown.

“It’s a tough question,” he said. “But I would say not ahead of a guy like me. Or, their numbers have to be far above.”

For the record, Damon entered Sunday’s game 56th all-time with 2,730 hits, 34th all-time with 1,647 runs scored and 43rd all-time with 517 doubles. He’s also 68th all-time in steals with 404 and 65th all-time in times on base.

The negatives are pretty obvious, too. Damon’s Hall of Fame case is largely a product of his durability and longevity. He’s made just two All-Star teams. He’s finished in the top 10 of his league in batting average just twice (10th in 2000, fourth in 2005). He’s never finished in the top of his league in on-base percentage, slugging, homers or RBI. His high MVP finish was 13th place in 2005.

Damon also probably won’t get much credit for his defense even though he spent the first half of his career as a pretty good center fielder.

Realistically, Damon has to get those 270 hits he needs for 3,000 in order to have a shot at the Hall of Fame. Even then, there’s going to be quite a bit of resistance to his case, simply because he was never viewed as one of his league’s best players at any point of his career.

Report: Steven Wright arrested on domestic assault charges

Greg Fiume/Getty Images
Leave a comment

WEEI’s Rob Bradford reports that Red Sox pitcher Steven Wright has been arrested on domestic assault charges. Bradford posted a screenshot that says Wright was arrested  on Friday evening and released Saturday morning. Along with domestic assault, Wright was also charged with prevention of a 911 call.

The Red Sox released a statement, which Bradford also provides:

We are aware of the incident involving Steven. This is certainly a matter that the Red Sox take very seriously. It is my understanding that both local police and MLB are looking into this and for that reason, the club won’t have any further comment at this time.

Wright’s lawyer, Alex Little, released a statement on behalf of the Wright family. Evan Drellich of NBC Sports Boston has that:

On Friday night, Steven was arrested at our home following a verbal argument, and the police charged him with domestic assault. Although he said things he deeply regrets, he did not raise his hand at anyone during the incident, and the situation was purely emotional. We are working together as a family to make our relationships stronger, and we ask that you respect our privacy as we do so.

Wright, 33, made only five starts in 2017 due to knee problems. He had season-ending surgery in May. Over parts of five seasons, the knuckleballer owns a 3.97 ERA in 287 2/3 innings.

Wright can be punished by Major League Baseball even if the charges end up dismissed. Victims of domestic abuse often don’t pursue legal action against their attackers and don’t cooperate with authorities for various reasons, including fear of revenge. We saw this with the Aroldis Chapman incident. He was still suspended 30 games.