Chase Headley AP

Chase Headley denies report of 2011 scuffle over ballpark dimensions


Earlier this week, ESPN’s Tim Koewn opened a story about ballpark dimensions by relaying an anecdote about a scuffle in the Padres’ clubhouse early last year.

Mike Adams, who now pitches for the Rangers, allegedly lashed out in a postgame rant, telling the team’s hitters to stop complaining about the dimensions at the pitcher-friendly PETCO Park. Ryan Ludwick and Chase Headley were among the targets of his comments, which resulted in some sort of ruckus.

Interesting story and I recommend reading Koewn’s piece, but Headley told Bill Center of the San Diego Union-Tribune yesterday that the scuffle never took place.

“Ninety-eight percent of that article as it pertained to myself and the Padres was 100 percent wrong,” said Headley, who then gave his recollection of the meeting.

“We were playing bad. We had a closed-door meeting. At the end of his comments, Bud asked if anyone had anything to add. Mike (Adams) mentioned we needed to focus on winning and stop worrying about the ballpark.”

“My name and Ludwick’s name were never said by Mike. I never even spoke to Mike about what he said. It’s 100 percent false. It was a big surprise to me to read that. I was shocked and really disappointed. It (the story) made me look like a jerk.

Padres manager Bud Black also denied that a scuffle took place and Adams told Richard Durrett of that he didn’t direct his message at any one person. ESPN continues to stand by the report, which was recounted by multiple sources.

Regardless of whether the incident took place, it wouldn’t be surprising if Ludwick and Headley were frustrated at the time. Ludwick mentioned in February that “playing in San Diego screwed me up” while Headley owns a lowly .658 career OPS at PETCO Park compared to an .814 OPS on the road. We learned last month that the Padres are in the process of conducting a study whether to alter the dimensions of the stadium.

Joe Girardi is not a fan of Game 162 scheduling

Joe Girardi
Getty Images

The Yankees fell behind early to the Orioles on Sunday afternoon, a day after dropping both ends of Saturday’s doubleheader. Their game, as did every other game on Sunday with the exception of the Braves-Cardinals doubleheader, started at 3:05 or 3:10 EDT, a change Major League Baseball recently made to create fairness on the final day of the season.

Girardi is not a fan. Per the Associated Press:

It was cloudy at Camden Yards at 3:05 p.m., but late-afternoon games often make it difficult for batters to see pitches.

Girardi said, “Here’s the thing that bothers me: If it’s a sunny day you’re playing in shadows.”

He added, “If it’s the most important game of the year to get in, I don’t think that’s right.”

Understanding the idea is for every team to play at the same time, Girardi said, “Then play all night games.”

One wonders if MLB had scheduled Sunday’s slate of games for the night, if Girardi would have instead complained about batters losing fly balls in the stadium lights. Furthermore, both teams have to play in the same conditions.

Video: Ichiro Suzuki pitches an inning for the Marlins

Ichiro Suzuki
AP Photo

Marlins outfielder Ichiro Suzuki was given an opportunity to play a new position in Sunday’s series finale against the Phillies. After the Phillies rallied to take a 6-2 lead in the seventh, the Marlins let Suzuki take the hill in the eighth. And, in news that surprises no one, he was impressive.

Though Suzuki gave up a run on two hits, he flashed a fastball that hit the mid-80’s and a breaking ball with some bite.

Suzuki, who turns 42 years old later this month, is 65 hits of 3,000 in his major league career. The Marlins are interested in bringing him back in 2016.