Some deluded baseball fans sue MLB, broadcasters over alleged video monopoly

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Blaming the legal system for stupid lawsuits is kinda like blaming guns for gun violence. They’re just tools that, when properly used, have their place.  It’s the idiots who use them recklessly that are the real problem:

A small group of baseball fans is suing Major League Baseball, its clubs and some television broadcast entities, claiming they collude to eliminate competition in the showing of games on the Internet and television … The lawsuit said the defendants possess monopoly power over the market for video presentations of major league games and have used the power to exclude or limit competition.

If I’m the judge that gets this case, my dismissal entry says “Monopoly power? Nonsense. Plaintiffs have every right to broadcast games themselves too.  In the event they have a billion dollars to buy such rights.”

In other news, yes, that first paragraph is an accurate description of my views on gun rights. Figured I’d inject that because I have been caricatured as a cliche liberal far too often around here lately.  When, in reality, I am a cliche liberal who happens to believe that people have the Constitutional right of private gun ownership in this country.

But yes, the rest of the cliche liberal stuff is probably right, so whatever.

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.