Shockingly, Rob Dibble is just fine with Cole Hamels throwing at guys

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You know what I do whenever a controversial topic comes up? I ask myself “I wonder what Rob Dibble thinks of all of this?”

Haha, actually, I don’t do that at all because that would be insane.  But CBS Radio in Philly did, and they asked him all about the Cole Hamels/Bryce Harper thing.

Dibble, not surprisingly, is a fan of mayhem. He said that if Cole Hamels wants to throw at someone “that’s Cole Hamels’ deal.” And added, “I kinda dig it.” Dibble also said that he approves of the whole “welcome to the big leagues” Old Time Baseball thing of throwing at a guy simply because he’s a rookie, noting that he did the same thing to Jeff Bagwell back in the day.

He also told some story about his Reds team once meted out justice to Dennis Martinez, hitting him several times in a game. Why? Because Dennis Martinez thew at Reds players once. Which … wait, I thought there was nothing wrong with that? Maybe that was just “Dennis Martinez’s deal!”  I’m so confused!

But never mind that. Dibble has been there and he’s here to tell us how it is. He said “it’s a hard game and it’s made harder when people don’t understand … ” and then he sort of trailed off into DibbleSpeak. Including another reference to Stephen Strasburg’s innings pitched limit being “crap,” which at this point you think Dibble of all people would stay away from, but I guess not. He never got around to what, exactly, we don’t understand.

Never change, Rob Dibble. Never change.

UPDATE:  Within ten minutes of the article going up, The Common Man runs a tracer on Dibble’s anecdotes and reveals him to be, shockingly, full of baloney:

He never hit Jeff Bagwell as a rookie.  He never hit Jeff Bagwell at all.  Looking back at the game logs on BR.com, Bagwell was hit once by the Reds (on Sept. 20, 1991), by Jose Rijo, in his rookie season, and then never again while Dibble was on the team.

Also, Dennis Martinez had 2 HBP in his career.  Now, they both were against the Reds, and they were in 1988 and 1990.  So…yeah…I just don’t know what to believe in anymore.

(hat tip to HBT’s prodigal commenter, Halladay’s Bicepts, for the heads up).

Rockies acquire Zac Rosscup from Cubs

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The Rockies announced a minor swap of relief pitchers on Monday evening. The Cubs sent lefty Zac Rosscup to the Rockies in exchange for right-hander Matt Carasiti.

Rosscup, 29, was designated for assignment by the Cubs last Thursday. He spent only two-thirds of an inning in the majors this year and has a 5.32 career ERA across 47 1/3 innings. Rosscup has spent most of the season with Triple-A Iowa, posting a 2.60 ERA in 27 2/3 innings.

Carasiti, 25, spent 15 2/3 innings in the majors last year, putting up an ugly 9.19 ERA. With Triple-A Albuquerque this season, he compiled a 2.37 ERA and a 43/13 K/BB ratio in 30 1/3 innings.

U.S. Court of Appeals affirms ruling that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law

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The Associated Press reported that on Monday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit affirmed a district court ruling which holds that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law, just like the major leagues.

In 2015, four minor leaguers sued Major League Baseball, alleging that MLB violated antitrust laws with its hiring and employment policies. They accused MLB of “restrain[ing] horizontal competition between and among” franchises and “artificially and illegally depressing” the salaries of minor league players.

The U.S. Court of Appeals said the players failed to state an antitrust claim, as the Curt Flood Act of 1998 exempted Minor League Baseball explicitly from antitrust laws.

This case is separate from the Aaron Senne case in which Major League Baseball is accused of violating the Fair Labor Standards Act. That case was recertified as a class action lawsuit in March. In December, Major League Baseball established a political action committee (PAC), which came months after two members of Congress sought to change language in the FLSA so that minor league players could continue to be paid substandard wages.