Omar Vizquel is now the oldest shortstop in MLB history

10 Comments

Yesterday the Blue Jays gave Yunel Escobar his first day off this season and Omar Vizquel got the start at shortstop, making history by becoming the oldest player to ever appear at the position.

Bobby Wallace held the previous mark by appearing in 12 games as a 44-year-old shortstop for the Cardinals in 1918, but Vizquel broke his record by making the start at age 45.

When informed about the record, Vizquel told Gregor Chisholm of MLB.com that he’s proud of all the hard work that enabled him remain an asset defensively:

When you go back 100 years to look for a record, it is pretty amazing, actually. I can’t believe that I’m still jumping around and playing shortstop at this age. I feel pretty good about myself, I feel pretty good about my physical condition. It hasn’t been a year of work, it has been constantly working out every year, trying to improve your speed or your flexibility. It has been really hard work.

Another way to stay young? Yelling at umpires from the bench until they eject you from a game you’re not even playing. Vizquel had a pretty busy week.

Report: Athletics to acquire Stephen Piscotty from the Cardinals

Scott Kane/Getty Images
1 Comment

Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports reports that the Athletics and Cardinals have agreed on a trade involving outfielder Stephen Piscotty. The Cardinals will receive two as yet unknown minor leaguers in return.

Piscotty, 26, hit .235/.342/.367 with nine home runs and 39 RBI in 401 plate appearances for the Cardinals this past season. He dealt with injuries and with his mother’s ALS diagnosis, so it was a rough year, but very excusably so. The Cardinals had signed him to a six-year, $33.5 million contract extension in March. He’s under contract through 2022 at a total of $29.5 million and has a club option for 2023 worth $15 million with a $1 million buyout.

The Cardinals had an outfield spot open up after agreeing to acquire Marcell Ozuna from the Marlins on Wednesday so the Piscotty trade doesn’t come as a surprise.