UPDATE: Jayson Werth suffers broken left wrist

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11:30 p.m. EDT update: It was announced after the game Sunday that Werth had suffered a broken left wrist. He’ll see a specialist on Monday as the Nats go about determining whether he has any ligament damage. If it’s a simple break, then 6-8 weeks is probably the best-case scenario. If there’s more damage, then he could miss 3-4 months or even the rest of the season.

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The Nationals are about to get Ryan Zimmerman and Adam LaRoche back, but it appears as though they may have lost Jayson Werth for a while.

Werth injured his left wrist attempting to make a sliding catch Sunday night against the Phillies and was immediately removed from the game. It’s the same wrist he had operated on twice in 2006, costing him the season.

If Werth suffered a break — and judging by the way he was holding it, it’s a possibility — he’ll probably miss a couple of months due to the injury and the Nationals will have to seriously consider bringing in some outfield help. They went after Denard Span last year and could try it again with the Twins already seemingly having fallen out of the race. However, their primary bait for Span, closer Drew Storen, is on the DL and probably won’t interest the Twins until he returns.

Of course, Alfonso Soriano and Chone Figgins are very much up for grabs. The Nats could also try picking up a veteran from Triple-A on the cheap, like the Yankees’ Dewayne Wise, Oakland’s Brandon Moss or Houston’s Justin Ruggiano.

Miguel Sano gained weight this offseason

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Not all players coming in to spring training are in The Best Shapes of Their Lives. Some have put on a few pounds, such as Miguel Sano, notes Twins GM Thad Levine:

Sano has been given medical clearance to engage in all baseball workouts with his teammates, his surgically reinforced left shin now completely healed, though the Twins intend to lighten his schedule to prevent any new injuries.

They’d like to lighten something else, too: His “generous carriage,” as General Manager Thad Levine delicately put it last week. Sano’s conditioning understandably lags, after a winter largely spent incapacitated by the surgery.

Sano’s conditioning has often been a topic of conversation among the members of the Minnesota press corps, though not always in good faith. For example, last year when Sano injured his shin by fouling a ball off of it, one member of the The Fourth Estate found a way to make a column out of blaming the freak injury on Sano’s conditioning. At least in this instance his colleague is correctly noting that the poor conditioning is a result of the injury and not the cause.

Still, it’s just another issue facing Sano this spring. He’s out of shape, coming off of an injury, and — not that he’s due any sympathy for it — he’s facing a likely suspension arising out of the allegations of sexual assault leveled against him late last year.

So this spring we’ll be seeing more of Sano, it seems. At least until that time we’ll be seeing less of him.