This isn’t the way Mariano Rivera was supposed to go out

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Maybe it’s still arguable on a quantity basis, but going strictly by quality, Mariano Rivera is the greatest reliever in major league history. The game’s all-time saves leader, Rivera has a 206 ERA+ in 1,219 2/3 career innings. The only reliever anywhere near shouting distance of that is Billy Wagner, who came in at 187 in 300 fewer innings. The only pitcher besides Rivera with even at 150 ERA+ in at least 1,000 innings is Pedro Martinez, who finished up at 154.

That’s just one way of trying to describe how awesome Rivera was statistically. There are more.  In his 17 seasons going into 2012, Rivera finished with a sub-2.00 ERA 11 times. His postseason record is ridiculous: a 0.70 ERA in 141 innings. Because of the way the game has changed, is should be nearly impossible in this day and age for a pitcher to make a dent on the all-time performance lists, but there’s Rivera 13th all-time in ERA and second in WHIP among those to throw at least 1,000 innings. The next best post-WWII pitcher on the ERA list is Hoyt Wilhelm at No. 45.

After Rivera at 2.21, no active pitcher with at least 1,000 innings has a career ERA under 3.00.

Fairness dictated that Rivera set his own path for leaving the game. It looked like he had done so; even though he hadn’t made it official, expectations were that this would be his last year.

But life is rarely fair. Rivera is a big long shot to make it back from a torn ACL this year, though what a story it would be if he could return in October. It’s doubtful he’ll rush into anything, but he’ll now have to decide whether to come back at age 43 next year. His arm will likely be up to the task, but this matter will come down to his head and his heart.

It’d be a huge shame if we’ve seen the last of Rivera on the mound at Yankee Stadium. He’s been a rock, completely unflappable, and the absolute greatest of all time at nailing down leads in the ninth. Life without him in the bullpen won’t be quite the same.

Video: Jake Arrieta hits a 465-foot home run off of Zack Greinke

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Jake Arrieta‘s bat is in midseason form already. The Cubs’ ace swatted a solo home run to center field off of Zack Greinke in Thursday afternoon’s Grapefruit League exhibition game, his first homer of the spring.

The blast went 465 feet, according to MLB.com’s Daren Willman.

Arrieta has hit two home runs in each of the past two seasons. Madison Bumgarner (eight) and Noah Syndergaard (four) are the only other pitchers to match or exceed his output in that department.

Greinke, meanwhile, is hoping to bounce back after a miserable 2016 season. He finished with an uncharacteristic 4.37 ERA in 26 starts in his first year with the Diamondbacks.

Luis Valbuena to miss four to six weeks with a strained right hamstring

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Angels first baseman Luis Valbuena will miss the next four to six weeks with a strained right hamstring, Pedro Moura of the Los Angeles Times reports.

Valbuena, 31, signed a two-year, $15 million contract with the Angels in January and was on track to get the lion’s share of the playing time at first base. While he’s out, however, C.J. Cron will handle first base on a regular basis. When Valbeuna returns, the two will likely form a platoon.

Last year with the Astros, Valbuena hit a solid .260/.357/.459 with 13 home runs and 40 RBI in 342 plate appearances.