Padres’ veteran double play duo Orlando Hudson and Jason Bartlett “could be released”

9 Comments

In trading standout reliever Ernesto Frieri to the Angels yesterday the Padres picked up a prospect they hope will be their long-term second baseman in Alexi Amarista.

He doesn’t project as a star player and for now Amarista is at Triple-A anyway, but Dan Hayes of the North County Times reports that the clock may be ticking on the Padres’ current double-play duo of veterans Orlando Hudson and Jason Bartlett.

In fact, Hayes writes that “team sources have confirmed that neither player is in the Padres’ long-term plans” and “both could be released before the season ends.”

Bartlett is hitting .164 and has a $5.5 million option or $1.5 million buyout for next season that vests if he reaches 432 plate appearances, which could make it tough to unload him via trade. Hudson is hitting .210 and has an $8 million option or $2 million buyout for next season, but with no plate appearance-based vesting he might be a bit easier to unload if San Diego eats all the remaining salary.

Whatever the case, Hayes clearly thinks there’s a good chance Amarista and Everth Cabrera are the Padres’ double-play duo in the second half. And maybe before then.

Miguel Sano gained weight this offseason

Getty Images
1 Comment

Not all players coming in to spring training are in The Best Shapes of Their Lives. Some have put on a few pounds, such as Miguel Sano, notes Twins GM Thad Levine:

Sano has been given medical clearance to engage in all baseball workouts with his teammates, his surgically reinforced left shin now completely healed, though the Twins intend to lighten his schedule to prevent any new injuries.

They’d like to lighten something else, too: His “generous carriage,” as General Manager Thad Levine delicately put it last week. Sano’s conditioning understandably lags, after a winter largely spent incapacitated by the surgery.

Sano’s conditioning has often been a topic of conversation among the members of the Minnesota press corps, though not always in good faith. For example, last year when Sano injured his shin by fouling a ball off of it, one member of the The Fourth Estate found a way to make a column out of blaming the freak injury on Sano’s conditioning. At least in this instance his colleague is correctly noting that the poor conditioning is a result of the injury and not the cause.

Still, it’s just another issue facing Sano this spring. He’s out of shape, coming off of an injury, and — not that he’s due any sympathy for it — he’s facing a likely suspension arising out of the allegations of sexual assault leveled against him late last year.

So this spring we’ll be seeing more of Sano, it seems. At least until that time we’ll be seeing less of him.