Chone Figgins

Is the Chone Figgins era over yet?

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Chone Figgins didn’t play in the Mariners’ loss Tuesday, but in the last three games he’s started, he’s gone 0-for-15 with six strikeouts from the leadoff spot. All three games turned into one-run defeats for Seattle.

Figgins is currently batting .189 in 95 at-bats for the season. He’s struck out 28 times already. Of course, he hit .188 in 288 at-bats last year.

Despite his struggles, Figgins was simply handed a starting job and the leadoff spot by the Mariners this season. Of course, his contract had a lot to do with that — the Mariners were hoping to find someone willing to take on a portion of the $17 million he was due through 2013. Figgins, though, hasn’t helped his cause there, and it’s doubtful anyone would take him unless he came at close to the minimum salary. Since that’s the case, the Mariners need to forget about money for a while and start playing their younger, better players.

With Mike Carp back from the DL this week, Figgins simply doesn’t belong in the Seattle lineup any longer. Kyle Seager looks like the long-term choice at third. Carp is a poor defensive left fielder, but he needs to play. Michael Saunders has done a nice job in center so far, though he’s cooling off now.

The Mariners don’t need to release Figgins, but they should be thinking of him as a utilityman, not a starter. And certainly not as a fixture in the leadoff spot. The Mariners are in better shape now than they have been in a couple of years, but it’s hard to take them seriously when they’re still playing guys for financial reasons.

Tim Tebow hits a homer in his first instructional league at bat

PORT ST. LUCIE, FL - SEPTEMBER 20: Tim Tebow #15 of the New York Mets hits a home run at an instructional league day at Tradition Field on September 20, 2016 in Port St. Lucie, Florida. (Photo by Rob Foldy/Getty Images)
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Because of course he did.

It wasn’t just his first at bat, but it was his first pitch. It came off of John Kilichowski, an 11th round draft pick of the St. Louis Cardinals out of Vanderbilt.  The ball went out to left center, off the bat of the lefty Tebow.

Next time, meat, throw him a breaking ball.

Joaquin Benoit blames overly-sensitive hitters for benches-clearing incidents

TORONTO, CANADA - SEPTEMBER 12: Joaquin Benoit #53 of the Toronto Blue Jays delivers a pitch in the seventh inning during MLB game action against the Tampa Bay Rays on September 12, 2016 at Rogers Centre in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. (Photo by Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images)
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The other night, Blue Jays reliever Joaquin Benoit needed help getting off the field after the second benches-clearing incident with the Yankees. It was later revealed that Benoit tore a calf muscle during the fracas, ending his season.

Yesterday he pointed the finger at just about everyone else for the incidents like the one that led to his injury. Hitters specifically. From The Star:

“I believe as pitchers we’re entitled to use the whole plate and pitch in if that’s the way we’re going to succeed,” Benoit said. “I believe that right now baseball is taking things so far that in some situations most hitters believe that they can’t be brushed out. Some teams take it personally.”

That “take it personally” line is interesting coming from Benoit as, in this instance, it seemed pretty clear that the whole plunking exchange which led to his injury started because Josh Donaldson took an inside pitch that did not seem to be a purpose pitch at all, too personally.

Did Benoit take a veiled swipe at his teammate here? If so, that’s pretty notable. If not it’s notable in another way, right? As it suggests that Benoit believes it’s OK for his teammates to take issue with inside pitches but anyone else who does is part of the problem?

Which is it, Joaquin?