The Marlins are fixing a hole where the rain gets in. And the grass too.

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Many holes, actually, though they’re expected and fairly common in new retractable roof stadiums:

A month in, the Marlins are still trying to figure out how to plug leaks in their 8,000-ton retractable roof and how to stop the grass from dying in the outfield.

The grass is dying because the roof has been closed too much and there hasn’t been enough sun when it has been open.  As for the leaks, it’s a matter of simply having lots of joints in a retractable roof and being unable to truly know where it’s leaking until the place is open for business and it, you know, rains:

“[Sunday] there were four of five spots where we had some drips coming down. The roof people were looking at those joints,” Samson said. “Again, it’s very normal [to have leaks].

“But you need it to rain and see where [the leaks are]. There have been different types of rains the last few days.

Little known fact: Samson is a a Quasi Supernormal Incremental Precipitation Inducer. Which, in layman’s terms, makes him a Rain God. But we in the media can’t call him simply that, because it would suggest that ordinary people knew something we didn’t.

Mike Napoli tore his ACL

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Mike Napoli suffered a torn right ACL and meniscus while playing for Triple-A Columbus the other night. The injury will require season-ending surgery.

Given that Napoli will turn 37 this year, given that he will need 10-14 months of rehab and given that, as it was, he was unable to find a major league gig, it’s almost certain that this injury will end Napoli’s career.

Napoli was off to a 1-for-24 start at Columbus after signing a minor league contract with the Indians this spring. He hit .193/.285/.428 for the Rangers in 2017. If this is it for Napoli, he’ll end his career with a line of .246/.346/.475 with 267 homers and 744 driven in. He appeared in the World Series with the 2011 Rangers, the 2013 Red Sox and the 2016 Indians, winning a ring with Boston.