Cardinals prospect Oscar Taveras is crushing Double-A pitching at age 19

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Oscar Taveras isn’t quite in the same class of prospect as Bryce Harper or Mike Trout, but now that those two are both in the majors the Cardinals outfielder is making his case as one of the minors’ elite young hitters.

Taveras won’t be 20 years old for another six weeks, but he’s currently destroying Double-A pitching after making the jump from low Single-A (where he hit .386 last season).

Taveras smacked his seventh homer last night, which is already just one short of a career-high, and is now hitting .347 with a .694 slugging percentage and 1.078 OPS in 24 games at Double-A. HardballTalk’s resident Cardinals fan, Drew Silva, has taken to calling him Oscar “Ted Williams” Taveras and the teenager figures to be near the top of most midseason prospect rankings after placing 74th on Baseball America‘s preseason list.

Marlins catcher J.T. Realmuto reportedly asks to be traded

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Craig Mish of MLB Network Radio is reporting that Marlins catcher J.T. Realmuto has requested a trade out of Miami. Jon Heyman is characterizing it as Realmuto telling the team that he “wouldn’t mind” a trade.

Either way, Realmuto has no power to force a trade. This isn’t the NBA or something. Still, it’s evidence of just how dreary a prospect remaining in Miami is for Marlins veterans in the wake of trades that sent Giancarlo Stanton to New York, Marcell Ozuna to St. Louis.

Realmuto, who will turn 27 just before the 2018 season, hit .278/.332/.451 with 17 homers, 65 RBI, and eight steals over 141 games this past season. He only has three years of service time and is arbitration eligible for the first time this offseason. He made just $562K in the 2017 and will get a big raise this year, but he’s still going to be underpaid based on his production. If the Marlins wanted to trade him, they’d get a nice return. Why they would want to trade him, I have no idea.

Expect more of this sort of thing as the Marlins slash payroll and make it clear that their immediate priorities are more about saving money and less about winning baseball games. Which may or may not be a valid goal for the team’s new owners, but is certainly a letdown for baseball players and fans.