Are we really doing the “Barry Zito has figured it out” thing again?

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There’s an article in the San Francisco Chronicle San Jose Mercury News about Barry Zito’s return to fine form. It’s totally encouraging:

Zito is off to one of the best starts of a 13-year career that has been mostly downhill since he came to the Giants in 2007. His first four starts have produced a 1.67 ERA, and opposing hitters have a .186 batting average. He is 1-0, having pitched a shutout against the Rockies in Colorado.

The article says this could be the product of Zito being happily married and now having a personal catcher in Hector Sanchez that has him pitching like he’s back in Oakland again.

Which is great — who doesn’t want to be happy? — but it’s not like we haven’t seen Zito have nice starts like this before.  Remember early May 2010?

Not only is Zito now 5-0 with a 1.49 ERA this season, he has a 2.38 ERA in 21 starts dating back to last year’s All-Star break.

He ended that season watching the Giants win the World Series as a spectator. Then he spent much of 2011 on the DL, out of the rotation and being rumored as a candidate to be released.

This happens with Zito. And with all players who aren’t all that good.  Sure, I want him to be successful because I still remember him when he had Cy Young form and liked that an awful lot, but we can’t read too much into the small sample sizes and early season success.  To do so is to get suckered.

Aaron Judge was involved in a weird play in the fourth inning

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Yankees outfielder Aaron Judge found himself front-and-center in a weird play in the bottom of the fourth inning during Game 4 of the ALCS on Tuesday evening. Judge drew a walk to lead off the frame. After Didi Gregorius lined out, Gary Sanchez flied out to shallow right-center.

Judge must have thought the ball had a high probability of falling in for a hit, so he was past the second base bag around the time he realized his mistake. He retraced his steps, running back to first base. Reddick’s throw hopped a couple of times but first base umpire Jerry Meals called Judge out on the tag-up play.

Manager Joe Girardi requested a review and the call was overturned: Judge was safe. However, Astros manager A.J. Hinch wanted to challenge that Judge did not re-touch second base on his way back. Rather than issuing a formal challenge, the Astros had to appeal the play by having starter Lance McCullers throw to second base, at which point second base umpire Jim Reynolds would issue a ruling. McCullers was a bit hasty, though, and made his appeal throw before Greg Bird stepped into the batter’s box. Reynolds told McCullers that he had to wait. So, McCullers again made his appeal throw.

This time, Judge was running and he was simply tagged out at second base for the final out of the inning. No need for a review.

As Ken Rosenthal explained on the FS1 broadcast, the Yankees were trying to “beat the police.” They knew Judge would have been ruled out — replays clearly showed he never re-touched the base — so they had nothing to lose by sending Judge. If he was safe, the Astros would no longer be able to appeal the play. If he’s out, then it’s the same outcome they would have had anyway.