A-Rod passes Willie Mays on the career RBI list

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Alex Rodriguez had a couple of moderately boring RBIs yesterday — infield hit and a groundout — but they put him someplace interesting: ahead of Willie Mays on the all-time RBI list. Which is kind of neat even if you appreciate the flaws of RBI as a stat.

A-Rod now has 1904 career RBI, which is one ahead of Mays.  Above him are only seven other players: Hank Aaron, Barry Bonds, Lou Gehrig, Babe Ruth, Stan Musial, Jimmy Foxx and Eddie Murray. He should pass Murray, Foxx and Musial this season. If he finishes with 95 RBI this year he matches Ruth, so it’s certainly within reach if has some hot stretches and stays healthy.

Kind of crazy to think this, but given how much we have focused on Alex Rodriguez’s personal life, personal foibles and the general baloney that surrounds him, I think we’ve sort of forgot how amazing a baseball player he has been for the past 18 years or so.

UPDATE: Bad mistake on my part. Two bad mistakes, actually.  First: Cap Anson and Ty Cobb should both be listed above A-Rod on the career RBI list. Anson had 2075, Cobb 1938. I was wrong not to include them.

The second mistake: my not double checking it to begin with.  I knew A-Rod passed Mays because I read it in a game story over the weekend, but I saw the leaders list this morning on ESPN and lazily parroted that list rather than check Baseball-Reference.com or some other official place. Being wrong is one thing, being lazy is another, and that’s my bad.

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.