The Tigers give Brandon Inge his unconditional release


Wow, this is pretty big. From the Twitter feed of the Tigers’ media relations dude:

This isn’t big because Brandon Inge is big — he’s pretty insignificant, baseball-wise these days —  but because he’s probably the single most polarizing player in the world of Detroit Tigers fandom. He’s one of those rare guys who is still beloved by many despite possessing little if any of the value he used to possess as a player.  Which, in turn, makes more analytical fans go nuts.  Wanna start an argument among Tigers fans? Just voice a strong opinion about Brandon Inge. He’s a player cum mascot about whom no one can be rational.  If you don’t believe me, go check out this thread over at Bless You Boys soon.  It’s bound to be nutsy within an hour or two.

But now he’s gone. As well he should be. He’s 2 for 20 on the year with no walks. He hasn’t had a useful season in a couple of years. He hasn’t had a good one in, like, seven.  With Miquel Cabrera at third he has no defensive value on this team. He has been playing some sub-par second base because, well, because he has to be somewhere. Or had to, anyway.

You may remember Eldred from some brief time with the Pirates and Rockies a few years ago.  At the moment he’s absolutely raking at Toledo:  he’s 31 for 80 with 13 — 13! — homers in 20 games so far this year. Of course he’s also 31 years-old, has been at triple-A for seven years and plays first base, so it’s not like he’s going to change the season.

But he can hit. Inge can’t, and that’s why he’s now gone.

(Thanks to Michael M. for the heads up)

Marlins granted permission to interview Larry Bowa

Larry Bowa
Leave a comment

The Miami Marlins, despite not having technically fired Dan Jennings, are actively interviewing for a new manager. Their latest target is a familiar name: Larry Bowa.

Jim Salisbury of reports on the coaching staff shakeup with the Phillies and, in the course of it, notes that the Marlins have asked and have been granted permission to interview Bowa, who is currently the Phillies’ bench coach. He has been offered a contract for 2016 by the Phillies, but he has never made a secret of his desire to manage again and has interviewed a few times over the years. Bowa, of course, managed the Padres in 1987 and 1988 and managed the Phillies from 2001 into the 2004 season.

As recently as a year ago it seemed unlikely that Bowa would get another look for a top job anyplace, what with baseball’s seeming eschewing of the crusty and feisty old managerial types in favor of young, inexperienced managers who had just recently retired from playing. But given how poorly that’s gone for most clubs — the Marlins included with Mike Redmond — this could be a winter in which we see a bunch of those old salty types returning.

Champagne after a loss? Why not?

Astros Wild Card

There was some hockey person last week arguing about how it was silly or untoward for baseball teams to celebrate clinching wild cards or other, less-than-championship-level accomplishments. Calling it bush league or lacking in act-like-you’ve-been-thereness or what have you. I can only imagine what he’d say about the Astros celebrating with champagne following (a) winning a wild card; and (b) losing the game which immediately preceded the celebration.

But screw him. Seriously.

I used to think that way. Indeed, if you search the HBT archives I’m sure there’s a post or two in which I disapprove of teams engaging in multiple champagne celebrations. But I was wrong about that and I’ve changed my mind on the matter over the past year or too. And on some other matters as well, all for the same reason: athletes are people just like us, not some avatars for our machismo and our fantasies. They’re people who have spent their entire lives devoted to their calling and do it under a lot of pressure and in the face of a lot of criticism and expectations from others. Why on Earth would anyone deny them their happiness upon the realization of an accomplishment?

This is even more true if you’re one of those misguided souls who erroneously believe that sports actually is separate from real life and believe them to be supremely and impossibly important. Even if you’re right — and you’re not — wouldn’t that give the athletes an even greater incentive to celebrate accomplishments? Funny how those people who who act as if sports is life and death would deny athletes their joy for defying death, as it were.

My view on the matter now is that if a guy hits a homer he should be able to celebrate it. If a pitcher strikes a guy out, he should be able to celebrate it. If a team makes the playoffs, no matter how low their seed and no matter the manner in which the accomplishment is achieved short of their competitors going down in a plane crash, they should be able to celebrate if they so choose.

So enjoy your hangovers this morning, Houston Astros.