The $8-small beer barrier has been broken

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Beer at the ballpark is expensive. We all know that and understand that because we all know that people need beer to survive as if it were oxygen and those criminals who run the ballpark have us over a barrel.

But it’s getting even more expensive:

Major League Baseball’s average price for a small beer rose from $5.81 last year to $6.16 this year. At this time last year, the highest price for a small beer was the $7.25 the Boston Red Sox were charging at Fenway Park. This year three teams have exceeded that price, with two breaking the $8 barrier for the first time ever.

The rest of that article is a beer price slide show, but if you make it all the way until the end you learn that the most expensive beer in baseball is in Detroit, where a small beer costs $8.75. That’s for 20 ounces, not 16, but it’s still an increase per ounce over last year’s prices for the then-small 16 ouncer.  And is more than I paid for sixer of Newcastle at the Giant Eagle last night.

In other news, if you’re heading to Comerica Park this summer, may I recommend stopping by here first?

(link via reader bloodysock)

Padres sign Jordan Lyles

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The Padres announced on Sunday that the club signed pitcher Jordan Lyles to a one-year major league contract with a club option for 2019. According to Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports, Lyles will earn $750,000 in 2018. Pitcher Travis Wood was designated for assignment to create room on the 40-man roster for Lyles.

Lyles, 27, had miserable results between the Rockies and Padres last season, compiling an aggregate 7.75 ERA with a 55/22 K/BB ratio over 69 2/3 innings. While he specifically gave up 24 earned runs in 23 innings across five starts with the Padres, it was a small sample. A full season at the pitcher-friendly Petco Park, as opposed to Colorado’s Coors Field, might help revitalize his career.

Wood, 30, went to the Padres at the non-waiver trade deadline from the Royals this past season. Overall, the lefty posted an aggregate 6.80 ERA with a 65/45 K/BB ratio in 94 innings. He’ll earn $6.5 million this season and has an $8 million mutual option with a $1 million buyout for 2019. So, the Padres are just eating $7.5 million minus the league minimum, assuming Wood latches on elsewhere.