The $8-small beer barrier has been broken


Beer at the ballpark is expensive. We all know that and understand that because we all know that people need beer to survive as if it were oxygen and those criminals who run the ballpark have us over a barrel.

But it’s getting even more expensive:

Major League Baseball’s average price for a small beer rose from $5.81 last year to $6.16 this year. At this time last year, the highest price for a small beer was the $7.25 the Boston Red Sox were charging at Fenway Park. This year three teams have exceeded that price, with two breaking the $8 barrier for the first time ever.

The rest of that article is a beer price slide show, but if you make it all the way until the end you learn that the most expensive beer in baseball is in Detroit, where a small beer costs $8.75. That’s for 20 ounces, not 16, but it’s still an increase per ounce over last year’s prices for the then-small 16 ouncer.  And is more than I paid for sixer of Newcastle at the Giant Eagle last night.

In other news, if you’re heading to Comerica Park this summer, may I recommend stopping by here first?

(link via reader bloodysock)

Jharel Cotton to undergo Tommy John surgery

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Athletics right-hander Jharel Cotton will undergo Tommy John surgery, per an announcement on Saturday. Cotton initially experienced some elbow soreness during a Cactus League start earlier this week and was officially diagnosed with a strained ulnar collateral ligament and strained flexor muscle on Thursday. He’ll be out of commission until 2019 at the earliest.

This isn’t the first time Cotton has dealt with elbow issues. According to’s Jane Lee, he had screws inserted in his right elbow after sustaining a stress fracture in 2013 and suffered some minor elbow discomfort again last fall. Prior to his diagnosis, the 26-year-old was poised for his third run with the A’s in 2018. He pitched his first full season with the club in 2017, turning in a 5.58 ERA, 3.7 BB/9 and 7.3 SO/9 in 24 starts and 129 innings.

Susan Slusser of the San Francisco Chronicle adds that the team is open to adding pitching depth this spring, though they’ll wait to see if the price goes down on some free agents first. Barring that, right-handed long reliever Andrew Triggs could be tabbed to fill the fifth spot in the rotation.