Mike Trout is hitting .419 with a 1.132 OPS at Triple-A

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One player certainly isn’t going to solve all of the Angels’ problems in the midst of a 6-12 start, particularly with veterans calling out manager Mike Scioscia in the media, but it’s tough to ignore the fact that stud prospect Mike Trout is hitting .419 at Triple-A.

As a 20-year-old, no less.

Trout is 31-for-74 (.419) with 10 extra-base hits, 11 walks, and six steals in 19 games, which is good for a .483 on-base percentage, .649 slugging percentage, and 1.132 OPS.

Now, certainly 19 games doesn’t mean Trout is ready to annihilate big-league pitching and the Angels’ logjam of first basemen, corner outfielders, and designated hitters hasn’t gone away, but most of that logjam isn’t actually, you know, hitting and there’s little reason to think guys like Bobby Abreu and Vernon Wells are going to suddenly turn everything around.

So when will the Angels call up Trout? Based on what Scioscia told Mike DiGiovanna of the Los Angeles Times, don’t hold your breath:

I don’t believe anything is imminent, but when you play at the level Mike is playing at now, you become more of a focal point of fans, the media and the organization. When a move is made depends on a lot of things. When you’re playing that well, you tend to push the door open for yourself, but right now he will continue to play [at Salt Lake] until something changes.

Sending a 20-year-old prospect to Triple-A to begin the season when he’d never played there before made plenty of sense, particularly considering the Angels’ veteran depth, but at some point you’d think Scioscia will grow tired of watching the old guys make outs. Or at least that’s what the Pacific Coast League pitchers are hoping.

Jonny Venters is still pitching

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Lefty reliever Jonny Venters was among a handful of players the Rays signed to minor league contracts, Marc Topkin of the Tampa Bay Times reports.

Venters, 32, hasn’t pitched in the majors since 2012 and has logged just 27 2/3 innings in the minors in the meantime due to a continuous battle with his elbow. According to David O’Brien of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Venters has undergone four — four! — Tommy John surgeries.

When he was healthy, Venters was a fearsome late-game option for the Braves. He posted a 1.95 ERA with 93 strikeouts in 83 innings in 2010, and a 1.84 ERA with 96 strikeouts in 88 innings in 2011. His first-half performance in 2011 earned him a spot on the National League All-Star roster.

Venters has spent the last two years in the Rays’ system and he’ll try to make it a third.