Oldest living ex-major leaguer turns 101

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The oldest living ex-major leaguer is a Cuban by the name of Conrado Marrero.

Marrero, a 5-foot-5 pitcher who played for the Washington Senators from 1950-54, turned 101 on Wednesday, and Paul Haven of the Associated Press was in Havana to document the occasion.

Click here to read the story, but here are some highlights:

  • Marrero is older than Fenway Park.
  • One of his favorite moments was beating the Yankees, yet he says his Senators were “lazy” and error prone.
  • He’s met Babe Ruth, Connie Mack and Dwight Eisenhower.
  • He retired from the majors and returned to play in the Cuban minor leagues, all before Fidel Castro came into power.
  • He doesn’t follow the majors much anymore, but is aware of Jamie Moyer’s comeback (what a whippersnapper!) and Yoenis Cespedes’ exploits.
  • He once had this exchange with Ted Williams: “One day Williams got two home runs off me, and afterward he came up to me and said `Sorry, it was my day today,” Marrero recalled. “I responded, `Ted, every day is your day.”‘

How fun it would be to sit down with Marrero and just let him tell stories all day.

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Miguel Sano gained weight this offseason

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Not all players coming in to spring training are in The Best Shapes of Their Lives. Some have put on a few pounds, such as Miguel Sano, notes Twins GM Thad Levine:

Sano has been given medical clearance to engage in all baseball workouts with his teammates, his surgically reinforced left shin now completely healed, though the Twins intend to lighten his schedule to prevent any new injuries.

They’d like to lighten something else, too: His “generous carriage,” as General Manager Thad Levine delicately put it last week. Sano’s conditioning understandably lags, after a winter largely spent incapacitated by the surgery.

Sano’s conditioning has often been a topic of conversation among the members of the Minnesota press corps, though not always in good faith. For example, last year when Sano injured his shin by fouling a ball off of it, one member of the The Fourth Estate found a way to make a column out of blaming the freak injury on Sano’s conditioning. At least in this instance his colleague is correctly noting that the poor conditioning is a result of the injury and not the cause.

Still, it’s just another issue facing Sano this spring. He’s out of shape, coming off of an injury, and — not that he’s due any sympathy for it — he’s facing a likely suspension arising out of the allegations of sexual assault leveled against him late last year.

So this spring we’ll be seeing more of Sano, it seems. At least until that time we’ll be seeing less of him.