Angels starting Mark Trumbo everywhere but third base

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Plans to give Mark Trumbo regular playing time at third base have gone by the wayside after he predictably struggled there defensively, so the Angels have used him at the hot corner just once in the past two weeks.

They have, however, used him just about everywhere else.

Trumbo started at designated hitter on April 19, left field on April 20, third base on April 21, first base on April, and right field yesterday. That’s five different positions in the span of five games, which shows the lengths manager Mike Scioscia will go to keep Trumbo’s bat in the lineup without suffering through his defense at third base.

With that said, Scioscia insisted to Alden Gonzalez of MLB.com that he hasn’t given up on Trumbo being a third baseman:

It’s a work in progress. I think in spring he showed the skill set to do what we feel a third baseman needs to do. It’s just that he had a couple of bumps in the road early, but we’re still working on it.

So far the Angels have played 149 innings this season and Trumbo has been at third base for 30 of them, committing three errors in just eight total chances. He is, however, hitting .324 with a .924 OPS.

The Hall of Fame rejected the BBWAA vote to make ballots public

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Last year, at the Winter Meetings, the BBWAA voted overwhelmingly to make Hall of Fame ballots public beginning with this year’s election. Their as a long-demanded one, and it served to make a process that has often frustrated fans — and many voters — more transparent.

Mark Feinsand of MLB.com tweeted a few minutes ago, however, that at some point since last December, the Hall of Fame rejected the BBWAA’s vote. Writer may continue to release their own ballots, but their votes will not automatically be made public.

I don’t know what the rationale could possibly be for the Hall of Fame. If I had to guess, I’d say that the less-active BBWAA voters who either voted against that change or who weren’t present for it because they don’t go to the Winter Meetings complained about it. It’s likewise possible that the Hall simply doesn’t want anyone talking about the votes and voters so as not to take attention away from the honorees and the institution, but that train left the station years ago. If the Hall doesn’t want people talking about votes and voters, they’d have to change the whole thing to some star chamber kind of process in which the voters themselves aren’t even known and no one discusses it publicly until after the results are released.

Oh well. There’s a lot the Hall of Fame does that doesn’t make a ton of sense. Add this to the list.