The lack of the DH in the NL imperiled Chien-Ming Wang’s marriage

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I’m a longstanding opponent of the Designated Hitter. I think it’s evil and wrong and Godless and I shudder to think that my children may hear about it from a stranger before I get a chance to have “the talk” with them about it.*

But something has happened that has thrown all of that into question. It’s a moral issue, really. You see: the lack of a DH in the National League has led to betrayal and disgrace:

Chien-ming Wang, Taiwan’s favorite major league baseball pitcher, confessed in an April 24 press conference held in Florida Viela, his team’s spring training site, that he had had an extra-marital affair two years ago while in Florida … At the press conference given to Taiwanese media, Wang said he made a “big mistake” and would not seek to make any excuses. He added that he does not expect forgiveness from his family or fans, but expressed “innermost apology.” He cited growing pressure from pitching in the major league, especially after his surgery in 2009. “I was so depressed at the time. Besides the long road to rehabilitation, the only thing I could do is wait,” said Wang.

The case here is clear: If the DH were ubiquitous, Wang doesn’t bat in an interleague game. If he doesn’t bat, he doesn’t run the bases. If he doesn’t run the bases, he doesn’t injure himself. If he doesn’t injure himself he’s not on that depressing, lonely “long road to rehabilitation,” and if he’s not on that road he does not have that affair.

Let’s put the DH in he NL now, people.  Not because it’s good — it’s far from it — but because the lack of the DH destroys families.

*“Son, when a man loves a woman very much, it can be a beautiful thing. Now, think of the polar opposite of that kind of beauty. Of horrors and awfulness as powerful as the greatest love in the world is wonderful. That, my son, is the DH.”

(link Via SBNation)

James Paxton has a fantastic new nickname

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James Paxton of the Mariners is 3-0 with a 1.39 ERA, 39 strikeouts and only six walks in 32.1 innings of work over five starts. Last night he shut the Tigers down, tossing seven shutout innings, striking out nine and allowing only four hits. With Felix Hernandez looking less than king-like lately, Paxton is asserting himself as the new ace of the Seattle staff.

And now the tall Canadian native has a nickname to match his ace-like status:

“Pax was really outstanding and we certainly needed it,” manager Scott Servais said of the Canadian southpaw. “Big Maple is what he was nicknamed tonight and I kind of like that. He was awesome.”

“Big Maple” is a fantastic nickname. That’s the sort of nickname guys used to get back when nicknames were great. Before managers just put “y” at the end of dudes’ names and before the “First Initial-First Three Letters of The Last Name” convention took hold in the wake of A-Rod.

“Big Maple.” That makes me smile. I’m gonna be smiling all dang day because of that.

The Rays gave Seth Smith a little league homer last night

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I mentioned this in the recaps this morning, but I think it deserves it’s own special place. Get what went down in the second inning of last night’s Rays-O’s game:

Ryan Flaherty was on first with Seth Smith up to bat. Smith hit a single to center. Flaherty, who was running with the pitch, was making for third base. All-world defender Kevin Kiermaier tried to gun him down but threw wildly to third, causing Flaherty to break for home.

Pitcher Alex Cobb had the play backed up, however! He got the ball near the dugout. Flaherty scampered back to third and Cobb tried to throw him out. The ball hit Flaherty’s helmet, richocheting into left field, allowing both Flaherty and Smith — who had stopped at first and then stopped at second, like a kid at tee ball or something — to come around and score.

Watch:

 

I still think the Rays walking home the winning run on four pitches in the 11th inning was worse, but this looked worse.

Oh well: the Rays get the day off today and tomorrow, of course, is another day.