Orlando Hudson’s days in San Diego may be numbered

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Scott Miller of CBSSports.com reports that the Padres are prepared to release second baseman Orlando Hudson if he doesn’t turn things around soon.

Hudson, 34, is batting .156/.191/.200 over his first 46 plate appearances this season. He seems to be losing his job to utility infielder Andy Parrino, who started last night against the Phillies and two out of the three games against the Rockies earlier this week.

Miller speculates that a possible release could coincide with the pending return of Logan Forsythe, who is scheduled to head to extended spring training this weekend after undergoing surgery in March to have the sesamoid bone removed from his left foot.

Releasing Hudson would be a major statement for the thrifty Padres, who have the lowest payroll in the majors at $55.6 million. Hudson is owed $5.5 million this year and a $2 million buyout on his $8 million option for next season. Still, he signed his two-year, $11.5 million deal under former GM Jed Hoyer and has batted just .237/.316/.336 with a .652 OPS over 131 games with San Diego.

The Padres lost their fourth straight game last night and now sit at a major-league worst 3-12 on the young season, so with Hudson on the steady decline and his trade value nil, it might be worth it to bite the bullet while seeing what younger players like Parrino and Forsythe can do.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.