Yes, Calvin Pickering, Carlos Baerga and Nick Esasky showed up for the Fenway bash

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There was no keeping up with all 216 players to show up on the Fenway Park field for the 100th anniversary celebration today. Fortunately, the Boston Globe has a list of all those in attendance.

Among the one-and-done Red Sox there were Carlos Baerga, Mark Whiten, Nick Esasky, Calvin Pickering, Sean Casey, Luis Alicea (I guess it only seemed like he was there for five years of mediocrity), Anastacio Martinez, Nick Green, James Lofton (no, that wasn’t Kenny), Kevin Jarvis, Wayne Gomes, Billy Jo Robidoux, Scott Schoeneweis and Dave Valle (.158 in 76 AB for the ’94 Red Sox).

There were plenty of notable absences, too. We knew Curt Schilling wasn’t coming, and Roger Clemens probably has some other things on his mind. But Wade Boggs couldn’t make it. Semi-active major leaguers Manny Ramirez and Johnny Damon weren’t there (Manny’s suspension might not have permitted him to be on the field anyway). Trot Nixon reportedly was attending his son’s Little League game. Yankees employees John Flaherty, Tony Pena and David Cone apparently weren’t willing to put on Red Sox uniforms. Dave Roberts had coaching obligations with the Padres.

Some other former Red Sox missing: Fred Lynn, Mike Greenwell, Ellis Burks, Bill Mueller, John Valentin, Troy O’Leary, Doug Mirabelli, Orlando Cabrera, Mark Bellhorn, Marty Barrett, Rickey Henderson, J.D. Drew, Bob Stanley and Rich Garces.

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.