Jamie Moyer was offered a post-baseball job

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After he became the oldest player to ever win a game the other night, Jamie Moyer said “I kind of wish I was a baseball historian.”  Well, his wish is the Hall of Fame’s command:

To that end, the Hall of Fame has offered Moyer the opportunity of a lifetime, to study in Cooperstown as part of the Museum’s Steele Internship Program, should he ever retire from the major leagues … Moyer will be eligible to join the Hall of Fame’s internship program following his retirement from the game.

The 2012 class of Frank and Peggy Steele interns, featuring 15 students from all across the country chosen from more than 500 applicants, will report to Cooperstown on May 29 to begin a comprehensive 10-week study, ranging from library and collections management to public programming and baseball research. The application deadline for each year’s class of Steele interns falls at the end of January.

I love the “should he ever retire from the major leagues” part. I mean, it’s a meritocracy, right? And he’s pitching better than Tim Lincecum right now.

(thanks to Jonny5 for the heads up)

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: