Angels announce four-year, $35 million contract extension with Erick Aybar

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Today the Angels and Erick Aybar made official what was all but finalized last week, announcing a four-year, $35 million contract extension for the switch-hitting shortstop.

Aybar, who’s making $5.075 million this season, gets $1.5 million more than double-play partner Howie Kendrick received in his four-year deal signed in January. Both players would have been free agents after this season.

Aybar’s extension begins next season and will keep him with the Angels through 2016, when he’ll be 32 years old. And because committing to a speedy shortstop into his mid-30s is generally a huge risk the Angels did well to get it done for only four years.

He’s off to a poor start this season and has never been a particularly strong hitter with a .274 batting average, .317 on-base percentage, and .377 slugging percentage in 640 career games, but Aybar captured his first Gold Glove award last season, adds value with his speed as well, and has been worth around $48 million during the previous four seasons according to Fan Graphs.

Alex Wood to try pitching out of the stretch

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Pedro Moura of The Athletic reports that Dodgers starter Alex Wood plans to pitch out of the stretch throughout the 2018 season. Wood got the idea when he watched Nationals starter Stephen Strasburg pitch against the Dodgers.

Wood, 27, finished last season 16-3 with a 2.72 ERA and a 151/38 K/BB ratio in 152 1/3 innings. That’s a mighty fine season, one in which many pitchers would not dare to mess with something that isn’t broken.

Interestingly, Wood indeed has had better results with runners on base — when he would pitch out of the stretch — as opposed to the bases being empty, with a respective OPS allowed of .523 versus .684, respectively. Over his career, he has allowed a .617 OPS with runners on and .706 with the bases empty.

In response to Moura’s tweet about Wood, retired pitchers Dan Haren and Jered Weaver took the opportunity to burn themselves. Haren tweeted, “I pitched a few seasons completely out of the stretch actually, just not by choice.” Weaver responded, “Sometimes I would just step off and throw the ball in the gap myself because I knew the hitter would do it anyways.”