Orioles claim Luis Exposito off waivers from Red Sox, designate Josh Bell for assignment

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Josh Bell, who twice cracked Baseball America‘s top 100 prospects list and was traded from the Dodgers to the Orioles for George Sherrill in mid-2009, has been designated for assignment.

Baltimore dropped Bell from the 40-man roster to make room for catcher Luis Exposito, whom they claimed off waivers from Boston. Exposito is a 26-year-old career minor leaguer with a .665 OPS at Triple-A, so he’s purely backup material.

All of which says a lot about how far Bell’s stock has fallen, which is what happens when you hit just .200 with three homers, a .485 OPS, and a horrendous 78-to-6 strikeout-to-walk ratio through 226 plate appearances as a big leaguer. Bell also hasn’t hit much at Triple-A, but he’s still young enough that another team might claim him off waivers.

Chris Woodward interviewed for the Yankees’ managerial position

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The Yankees interviewed Aaron Boone for their managerial vacancy on Friday, and today it was Chris Woodward’s turn. That makes at least five interviews since the offseason began, and Woodward’s likely won’t be the last.

Like fellow candidate Eric Wedge, whom the Yankees interviewed just last week, Woodward has never played or coached for the club. He spent the majority of his 12-year career with the Blue Jays and picked up brief stints with the Mets, Braves, Mariners and Red Sox before returning to Toronto for his final season in 2011. Following retirement, he served as the Mariners’ minor league infield coordinator and infield and first base coach from 2012-2015. During the 2015 offseason, he jumped over to the National League to work with the Dodgers as a third base coach, and saw his first postseason run since the Mets lost to the Dodgers in the 2006 NLDS.

While Woodward has yet to manage at the major league level, he was named manager of the New Zealand national team during the 2017 World Baseball Classic qualifiers. It’s certainly conceivable that the Yankees would prefer a candidate with significant experience leading a major league team, but right now the only person who fits that bill is Eric Wedge — and, well, it’s Eric Wedge.