Settling the Score: Saturday’s results

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Another day, another impressive Nats victory.

Saturday’s starter Edwin Jackson needed only 92 total pitches to get through nine innings of one-run ball as Washington grabbed a 4-1 victory over the visiting Reds at an energized Nationals Park.

E-Jax, who was signed to a team-friendly one-year, $11 million free agent contract this winter, struck out nine batters and issued just one walk. The Nats sit alone atop the National League East standings with a 7-2 record and seem poised to remain competitive all summer on the back of their suddenly imposing starting rotation — which has drawn an excellent nickname in “K Street.”

Your Saturday box scores:

Reds 1, Nationals 4

Astros 5, Marlins 4

Brewers 1, Braves 2

Indians 11, Royals 9 (10 innings)

Tigers 1, White Sox 5

Orioles 6, Blue Jays 4

Mets 5, Phillies 0

Rays 5, Red Sox 13

Rangers 6, Twins 2

Cubs 1, Cardinals 5

Angels 7, Yankees 1

Athletics 0, Mariners 4

Padres 1, Dodgers 6

Pirates 3, Giants 4

Diamondbacks 7, Rockies 8

Must-Click Link: The Day a Mascot Got Ejected

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Today Jonah Keri gives us a fantastic story about a crazy game.

The Dodgers played the Expos in Montreal 28 years ago today. The game went 22 innings. It was a 1-0 game. More notable than the 21 and a half innings of scoreless ball, however, was the fact that Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda got the Expos mascot — Youppi — ejected. The Dodgers and Expos didn’t score much that year overall, but when have you ever seen a mascot ejected?

Some good lunchtime reading for y’all, complete with silly GIFs and a video of the whole dang game if you hate yourself so much that you’d watch it all in its entirety.

Nicholas Castellanos hit an inside-the-park homer that shouldn’t have been

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Last night the Yankees pasted the Tigers in Detroit, but the hometown crowd did get something entertaining to send them on their way: an inside-the-park homer from Nicholas Castellanos.

At least that’s technically what it was. It would be a single and a three-base error if our official scoring made any sense.

Watch the play below. It’s all put in motion by Jacoby Ellsbury‘s decision to try to make a slide catch on the ball, misjudging it and allowing it to skip over 100 feet to the wall:

Since Ellsbury didn’t touch it it wasn’t called an error — errors are rarely if ever called on poor plays that don’t result in a fielder actually touching the ball — but it was certainly a mental error to not let the ball bounce and ensure that it didn’t get past him. Especially with such a big lead.

Oh well, that’s baseball for you.