Tim Hudson allows five runs over four innings in second rehab start

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From Carroll Rogers of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution comes word that Tim Hudson allowed five runs on nine hits over four innings tonight in his second minor league rehab start with Class A Rome.

That’s a pretty ugly line, but Rogers notes that he was the victim of a “ton of seeing-eye stuff.” On the bright side, he threw 45 out of 62 pitches for strikes while striking out one and walking none.

Hudson is currently rehabbing from November surgery to repair a herniated disc in his back. He tossed two scoreless innings in a Grapefruit League game last Monday against the Mets before allowing two runs (one earned) over three innings in his first rehab start last Saturday. Barring any setbacks, he should be fully stretched out to join the Braves’ rotation in late April or early May.

Hudson, 36, went 16-10 with a 3.22 ERA and 158/56 K/BB ratio over 215 innings last season. He owns an impressive 3.16 ERA since the start of the 2007 season. Roy Halladay, Adam Wainwright, Johan Santana, Tim Lincecum, Felix Hernandez and CC Sabathia are the only pitchers (with at least 800 innings pitched) with a lower ERA during the same time frame.

Former Yankees prospect Manny Banuelos signs a minor league deal with the Dodgers

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Remember Manny Banuelos? He was once a top pitching prospect for the Yankees and then, apparently disappeared from the face of the earth. Or at least it felt like it. Now he’s in the news, however, as the Dodgers have signed him to a minor league contract.

OK, Banuelos didn’t disappear. He was traded to the Braves in 2015, had a cup of coffee with them, pitching pretty ineffectively in seven big league games, was released by Atlanta in the middle of 2016 and then latched on with the Angels. This past season he posted a 4.93 ERA over 95 innings while being used mostly as a reliever at Triple-A Salt Lake.

Banuelos pitched in the Future’s Game in 2009 and was a star in the Arizona Fall League in 2010. He was a top-50 prospect heading into 2011 before falling to Tommy John surgery in 2012. With Atlanta he suffered some bone spur problems and then some elbow issues that never resulted in surgery but which never subsided enough for him to fulfill his potential either. He suffered injuries. A lot of pitchers do.

It’s unrealistic to think that Banuelos will fulfill the promise he had six years ago, but he’s worth a minor league deal to see if the 26-year-old can at least be a serviceable reliever.