Ozzie Guillen Getty

Miami-Dade mayor: “The freedom-loving people” of Miami want Ozzie Guillen fired

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L’affair Ozzie is continuing apace. We’ve had the comment, the outrage, the apology, the media hand-wringing, and now the political opportunism.

In the run-up to Ozzie Guillen’s second apology over his Castro comment, Carlos Giminez, the Mayor of Miami-Dade County, calls for his termination. Because apparently there is nothing more satisfying to “freedom-loving people” than to fire a person for voicing a weak, unpopular political opinion:

“I join the rest of our Miami-Dade County community and all freedom-loving people in condemning the statement made by Miami Marlins Manager Ozzie Guillen,” Gimenez said in a 5 p.m. statement. “For too long, the Marlins organization has been the source of controversies in our community and I now challenge them to take decisive steps to bring this community back together.”

“Bring this community back together?”  Call me crazy, but I have this feeling that a community that is strong enough to have escaped Castro and build what it has built in Miami is not capable of being destroyed by an isolated incident of one loudmouth saying something ill-considered to a magazine reporter.

Anyway, Gimenez didn’t say what those “decisive steps” were, but it’s pretty clear that he wants Guillen fired. Which, as I said yesterday, seems preposterous to me. At least if you treat this as merely a matter of Ozzie Guillen spouting off.

But maybe it’s not just about Ozzie spouting off to Miami politicians. That comment about the Marlins being “the source of controversies”  is loaded with meaning, likely being a reference to the funding of the new ballpark, which is now the subject of a federal investigation. That messiness led directly to Mr. Giminez getting his job, when his predecessor was recalled due to his involvement in alleged shadiness. Moreover, the matter of who supported public money for the Marlins became an issue in the subsequent election to replace the old mayor, with Giminez being an anti-stadium dollars guy.

Which, hey, good for him because that’s admirable. But it also suggests that being tough on the Marlins is part of Gimenez’s recent political DNA too.  Which suggests that Guillen is being seized on, not only because he said something that people in Miami don’t like, but because it’s politically expedient for some folks to make the Marlins into the boogeyman.

So, the theater continues. The allegedly shocking comment, the outrage, the first apology, the media hand-wringing, the second apology and now the political opportunism. All that’s left are the lawsuits, right? That’s how this sort of thing tends to go, isn’t it?

BBWAA votes to make all Hall of Fame ballots public beginning next year

Cooperstown
Associated Press
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In addition to naming the Spink Award winner this morning, the Baseball Writers Association of America voted today to make all Hall of Fame ballots public beginning with next year’s vote for the 2018 induction class.

As of now, writers are encouraged to make their votes public and, if they do, they are placed on the BBWAA website. They are not required to, however, and a great many Hall of Fame voters do not. While ballot secrecy is laudable in politics, the Hall of Fame vote brings with it a fundamentally different set of concerns and sentiment has increasingly favored transparency, as opposed to secrecy when it comes to the Hall of Fame.

While some in opposition to this move may claim that public ballots will only lead to criticism, our view is that if you can’t handle some reasonable criticism over your Hall of Fame ballot, you probably need to get out of the business of making history, which is what voting for the Hall of Fame really is.

The Yankee2 to retire Derek Jeter’2 number next 2ea2on

Derek Jeter
Getty Images
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RE2PECT: The Yankees just announced that they will retire Derek Jeter’s number 2 next season. The ceremony will take place on May 14, 2017 at Yankee Stadium.

With Jeter’s number 2 retired the Yankees will have retired 21 numbers. Twenty-two if you count number 8 twice, given that it was retired for both Yogi Berra and Bill Dickey. They also have retired 42 twice, once for Jackie Robinson, which every team has retired, and once for Mariano Rivera who donned 42 before the league-wide retirement of the number. The Yankees will also have put every single-digit number on the shelf. Except for zero, anyway, which no Yankees player has ever worn.

The retired pinstripes break down as follows:

1 Billy Martin
3 Babe Ruth
4 Lou Gehrig
5 Joe DiMaggio
6 Joe Torre
7 Mickey Mantle
8 Yogi Berra
8 Bill Dickey
9 Roger Maris
10 Phil Rizzuto
15 Thurman Munson
16 Whitey Ford
20 Jorge Posada
23 Don Mattingly
32 Elston Howard
37 Casey Stengel
42 Mariano Rivera
44 Reggie Jackson
46 Andy Pettitte
49 Ron Guidry
51 Bernie Williams