Brandon Allen

Rangers should grab Brandon Allen off waivers from A’s

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Left-handed hitting first basemen/designated hitters certainly aren’t in popular demand at the moment, and there’s a good chance Brandon Allen will clear waivers after being designated for assignment by the A’s on Monday. Still, there are a few teams that might want to take a chance on him, including Oakland’s division rival in Texas.

The Rangers currently have just three left-handed hitters on their roster and failed Orioles prospect Brandon Snyder occupying a bench spot. Allen could come in as an occasional first baseman and DH against right-handers, and he might prove to be an upgrade on Mitch Moreland if given the chance.

Allen is a flyball hitter, so he was a pretty poor fit in Oakland from the start. Not only is the Coliseum outfield big, but the vast expanse of foul territory turns more infield pops into outs. He’d be a whole lot more likely to contribute in Texas. He still wouldn’t hit for a strong average, but he’d be a better bet to come in at .240-.250, and with his power and walk rate, that’d probably make him pretty valuable.

Philadelphia is another team I think Allen would help, but the Phillies aren’t going to cut any of their veteran part-timers to make room for him, even if he might be a better stopgap first baseman than anyone else on the roster.

If Texas passes, then I don’t see any obvious candidates to claim Allen. The Cubs are being pretty aggressive in trying to collect talent, but they’ll probably pass unless they think Allen is athletic enough to contribute as a part-time outfielder (he started 14 games in the left field for the Diamondbacks in 2010). I’d like to see Allen in Yankee Stadium, but the Bombers don’t have room on their bench. Allen is out of options, so if a team claims him and tries sending him to Triple-A, he’d have to go right back on waivers again.

Mike Scioscia will return as Angels manager in 2016

ANAHEIM, CA - JULY 21:  Manager Mike Scioscia #14 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim in the dugout during batting practice before a game against the Minnesota Twins at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on July 21, 2015 in Anaheim, California.  (Photo by Jonathan Moore/Getty Images)
Photo by Jonathan Moore/Getty Images

It was assumed already, but Mike Scioscia made it official during Monday’s press conference for new general manager Billy Eppler that he will return as Angels manager in 2016.

Scioscia, the longest-tenured manager in the majors, has been at the helm with the Angels since 2000. There was a clause in his contract which allowed him to opt out after the 2015 season, but he has decided to stay put. He still has three years and $15 million on his contract, which runs through 2018.

Jerry Dipoto resigned as Angels general manager in July amid tension with Scioscia, so there were naturally questions today about what to expect with first-time GM Eppler in the fold. According to David Adler of, Scioscia isn’t concerned.

“I think we’re going to mesh very well,” Scioscia said. “If we adjust, or maybe he adjusts to some of the things, there’s going to be collaboration that’s going to make us better.”

Eppler is the fourth general manager during Scioscia’s tenure with the team.

After winning the AL West last season, the Angels finished 85-77 this season and narrowly missed the playoffs. The team hasn’t won a postseason game since 2009.

Carlos Gomez says he’ll be in lineup for Wild Card game vs. Yankees

Houston Astros' Carlos Gomez hoops after scoring a run against the Texas Rangers in the eighth inning of a baseball game Sunday, Sept. 27, 2015, in Houston. Gomez scored from third base on a Bobby Wilson passed ball. The Astros won 4-2. (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan)
AP Photo/Pat Sullivan

Astros center fielder Carlos Gomez sat out the final series of the regular season in order to rest a strained left intercostal muscle, but there was good news coming out of a workout today in advance of Tuesday’s Wild Card game vs. the Yankees.

This has been a lingering issue for Gomez, who missed 13 straight games with the injury last month. He aggravated the strain on a throw to home plate last Wednesday and was forced to sit while the Astros fought to keep their season alive. Astros manager A.J. Hinch told reporters last week that Gomez’s injury would typically take 45-50 days to recover from, so it’s fair to wonder how productive he can be during the postseason.

Gomez mostly struggled after coming over from the Brewers at the trade deadline, batting .242 with four home runs and a .670 OPS over 41 games.