Former Cy Young winner takes powerful drug to aid his performance, no one cares


What if I were to tell you that there was a former Cy Young winner who was taking a controversial and powerful drug?

A drug that could prove dangerous to him in the long run and has been linked to organ damage? A drug that other players who have used it say gives them a feeling of invulnerability? A drug that experts are wary of for athletes because its long term effects when taken regularly aren’t known? A drug that is injected into the buttocks. A drug that, despite all of this, the player uses because it helps him recover from injury, soreness and fatigue and helps him get back on the field?

Why, I hope you would say nothing, because as David Lennon of Newsday reports, it’s totally OK in Major League Baseball:

When Johan Santana said last week that he received an injection of Toradol, a powerful anti-inflammatory medication, to stay on schedule for his Opening Day start, it hardly raised eyebrows in the clubhouse.

The reason? Santana is not the only one to benefit from the drug, and its use is more common than people might think.

There is not some logical bright line between what is a horrible, terrible PED and what is an acceptable drug in the world of sports. We like to pretend there is, but really, there isn’t. The biggest difference is that some are on a banned list and some are not, and that Santana and others use Toradol under a physicians care and guys who take banned drugs don’t.

Ultimately, these drugs are allowing players to do what their body would not naturally allow them to do. Here, it’s ignoring pain that could keep them from playing or certainly playing well.  With other drugs, it’s recovering from injury faster (HGH) or hitting a ball farther than they otherwise might (steroids). Either way, their performance is enhanced. Their natural state is altered by pharmaceuticals.

It would be awesome if we could approach some of the banned PEDs in this way and determine whether they present acceptable risks. Whether they serve a valuable purpose that, under a doctor’s care, don’t raise serious ethical concerns.  But we just don’t roll that way in professional sports these days.

Justin Turner suffers broken wrist after being hit by a pitch

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Dodgers third baseman Justin Turner left Monday’s Cactus League game against the Athletics after he was hit by a pitch. He went for X-rays, revealing that he suffered a broken wrist, Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times reports. Shaikin adds that Turner is unlikely to return before May, noting that Braves first baseman Freddie Freeman missed six weeks with a similar injury last year and Astros outfielder George Springer missed nine weeks in 2015.

Needless to say, this is a huge loss for the Dodgers. Last year, Turner hit .322/.415/.530 with 21 home runs and 71 RBI in 543 plate appearances, helping the Dodgers reach the World Series. He made the All-Star team for the first time in his career and finished eighth in NL MVP balloting.

Thankfully, the Dodgers have some versatile players on the roster. Logan Forsythe could move from second base to third, giving Chase Utley more playing time at second. Enrique Hernandez could man the hot corner as well. Chris Taylor has played some third base, or he could shift to second base in Forsythe’s stead. The club should shed some light on how it plans to move forward following Turner’s injury.