Josh Collmenter isn’t long for the Diamondbacks rotation

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Forget that Josh Collmenter had a 3.59 ERA in his 24 starts as a rookie last season. If many Diamondbacks fans had their way, he would have been demoted to the pen before 2012 even opened.

Those calls will only get louder now. Collmenter followed up a Cactus League season in which he went 0-4 with a 9.95 ERA by giving up six runs — five earned — in three innings Sunday against the Giants.

The case against Collmenter wasn’t personal, but Diamondbacks fans are undoubtedly excited to see what pitching prospects Patrick Corbin, Tyler Skaggs and, especially, Trevor Bauer can do. Much of Collmenter’s rookie success was credited to his deceptive windup, something that hitters figure to get more accustomed to this year. Collmenter throws just 86-89 mph and lacks a plus breaking ball to go along with his fine changeup, so if hitters start seeing the ball better against him, they’ll likely knock him around pretty good. The Giants certainly had his number today, with Buster Posey taking him deep and light-weights Gregor Blanco and Brandon Crawford picking up doubles.

It seems like only a matter of time before Collmenter is shifted to the pen. But the Diamondbacks will face an interesting decision when that happens. Corbin, Skaggs and Bauer are all in Double-A right now, and the team would likely prefer not to have to turn to any of them before June. Wade Miley might get the spot on a temporary basis. He relieved Collmenter today and pitched four hitless innings to get the Diamondbacks back into the game.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: