Ubaldo Jimenez loses no-hitter in seventh against Blue Jays

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2:43 p.m. EDT: Brett Lawrie broke up the no-hitter with a two-run single to center with two outs in the seventh. The runners had previously moved up on a wild pitch, allowing the single to tie the game at 2.

Jimenez finished the seventh from there, but since he’s at 95 pitches now, there’s a good chance he’s done for the day.

2:40 p.m. EDT: Jimenez walked two of the first three batters in the seventh, leading to visit from the pitching coach and Rafael Perez getting up in the bullpen. The one out came despite Shin-Soo Choo losing a fly to right-center in the sun. Fortunately, center fielder Michael Brantley was able to step in and catch it.

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Ubaldo Jimenez retired the first 17 batters he faced and has took a no-hitter into the seventh inning Saturday against the Blue Jays.

Jiemenz and Brandon Morrow actually had dueling no-hitters going into the bottom of the fifth. After Morrow started that frame with two quick outs, J.P. Arencibia committed a throwing error on Casey Kotchman’s grounder in front of the plate. It should have been the third out of the inning, but Jason Kipnis followed it with a two-run homer before Jack Hannahan struck out.

Jimenez didn’t allow a baserunner of any sort until Colby Rasmus walked with two outs in the sixth. He’s at 75 pitches through six.

The exceptional outing follows an exhibition season in which Jimenez allowed 24 runs — 19 earned — and 30 hits in 23 innings. He struck out 15 and walked 15 in his seven starts.

David DeJesus retires

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Outfielder David DeJesus announced his retirement from Major League Baseball on Twitter Wednesday afternoon. He’ll be joining CSN Chicago for Cubs coverage.

DeJesus, 37, spent 13 seasons in the big leagues from 2003-15 with the Royals, Athletics, Cubs, Nationals, Rays, and Angels. He hit a composite .275/.349/.512 with 99 home runs and 573 RBI across 5,916 plate appearances.

We wish the best of luck to DeJesus as he begins a new career in sports media.

Dallas Green: 1934-2017

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Former major league pitcher, manager, and front office executive Dallas Green has died at the age of 82, Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports reports.

Green pitched for the Phillies for the first five years of his career from 1960-64, then went to the Washington Sentators, the Mets, and back to the Phillies before retiring after the ’67 season. He managed the Phillies from 1979-81, leading them to the organization’s first ever championship in ’80. The Cubs hired Green after the 1981 season to serve as executive vice president and general manager. He quit after the ’87 season. Green briefly managed the Yankees in ’89, then took the helm of the Mets from ’93-96.

Green was a controversial figure during his managing and GM days as he was not afraid to say exactly what he was thinking. He got into many conflicts with his players and coaches, but some think it helped the Phillies in the World Series in 1980. The Phillies inducted him into their Wall of Fame in 2006.